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Annex E.a. DUNS Instructions

Procurement Notice

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is seeking proposals for technical assistance (TA). This TA is intended to support planned activities under the Sector-Wide Program Management and Monitoring (SWPMM) Operational Plan (OP) under the Health Services Division (HSD), Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MOHFW).

Using antiretrovirals (ARVs) as tracer products, we identified the following key practices that may affect supply chain management at the facility level: order verification, actions taken when stock is received, changes in prescription and dispensing due to ARV stock-out, actions to ensure patient adherence, and communication with other affiliated facilities and higher-level supply chain management. We propose a set of indicators to measure these practices.

Since 1971, MSH has worked in more than 150 countries to strengthen health systems and help our partners consistently deliver effective, affordable, and available medicines and services. We lead by supporting and educating, helping people build on what they already know to ultimately take charge of their own development—and their own health.

Year Ended June 30, 2018, drawn from audited financial statements.

The USAID-funded Challenge TB project collaborated with the Ethiopian National TB Control Program (NTP) and regional health bureaus to integrate TB screening into all health service outlets across the country. The intensive support included mentorship of hospital staff by zonal and regional teams, routine check-ins, on-site capacity building, and close follow-up.

Previously, Ethiopia used conventional methods for mycobacteria culture and drug susceptibility testing, which take 4-12 weeks to get results and require sequential procedures for the diagnosis. The recently introduced second-line probe assay (SL-LPA) delivers results in just 24-48 hours, a vast improvement over the conventional method.

The Ethiopian National TB Program (NTP) has made important contributions to the decentralization of multidrug-resistant (MDR) treatment and follow-up sites across the country.

The Technical Support Services Project (TSSP) worked with the Tanzania Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC) to analyze data to project future health care employment needs, including current and future vacancies, and create a five-year recruitment and staffing plan.

The Leadership Development Program (LDP+) is an experiential approach developed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The program enables individuals at all levels of an organization to develop the skills they need to lead, manage, and govern programs; meet challenges; and achieve measurable desired results.

On July 10th, staff from MSH and Scope shared lessons learned while working with government and other partners in Kenya and Uganda to adapted a group antenatal care (ANC) model, called 'pregnancy clubs,' to the local context using human-centered design and tested the innovation in selected public sector facilities.Women who participated in the pregnancy clubs described better and more respectful e

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is implementing a project to strengthen high-quality, culturally appropriate antenatal care (ANC) for indigenous women in the Quetzaltenango department of Guatemala.

Metro Manila, PhilippinesAugust 19-20, 2019 The Department of Health (DOH) of the Philippines, with support from its technical partners, is strengthening the procurement and supply chain management (PSCM) system for health commodities.

This report summarizes significant USAID MTaPS achievements, key challenges, program performance, and adaptation in response to new demands and lessons learned for the April through June 2019 period. The report is organized by health area, objective, region, and country.

Afghanistan accounts for two-thirds of the global area under opium poppy cultivation and produces 70 percent of the world’s opiates.

The objective of the USAID-funded Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK) project (communication and health prevention) is to promote key healthy behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities. As the capacity building lead, MSH’s role has been to build the organizational leadership, management, and governance (L+M+G) capacities of public sector and health no

In 2014, the Government of Angola introduced a national community development and health worker program to address challenges affecting the poor.

To address the high burden of TB in the Philippines, the National TB Control Program (NTP) of the Department of Health (DOH) is working to ensure access to TB medicines.

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, and this is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence is often due to patient-related factors, but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of TB medicines.

The National TB Control Program (NTP) in the Philippines is continuously scaling up its operations in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) to achieve the results and deliverables described in the 2010–2016 Philippine Plan of Action to Control Tuberculosis.

USAID’s Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Project supports reforms in managing medicines by strengthening pharmaceutical-sector governance, optimizing pharmaceutical-sector finance, and supporting improved availability and use of essential medicines in Ukraine.

The WHO’s Rapid Access Expansion (RAcE) program supported the Malawi Ministry of Health to align their Community-Based Maternal and Newborn Care (CBMNC) package with the latest WHO guidelines and to implement and evaluate the feasibility and coverage of home visits in Ntcheu district. A population-based survey of 150 households in Ntcheu district was conducted in July-August 2016 after approximately 10 months of CBMNC implementation. Thirty clusters were selected proportional-to-size using the most recent census. In selected clusters, five households with mothers of children under six months of age were randomly selected for interview. The Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) providing community-based services to the same clusters were purposively selected for a structured interview and register review. Less than one third of pregnant women (30.7%) received a home visit during pregnancy and only 20.7% received the recommended two visits. Coverage of postnatal visits was even lower: 11.4% of mothers and newborns received a visit within three days of delivery and 20.7% received a visit within the first eight days. These findings were similar to previous studies, calling into question the feasibility of the current visitation schedule. It is time to re-align the CBMNC package with what the existing platform can deliver and identify strategies to better support HSAs to implement home visits to those who would benefit most.

Malawi has a mature integrated community case management (iCCM) programme that is led by the Ministry of Health (MOH) but that still relies on donor support. From 2013 until 2017, under the Rapid Access Expansion (RAcE) programme, the World Health Organization supported the MOH to expand and strengthen iCCM services in four districts. This paper examines Malawi’s iCCM programme performance and implementation strength in RAcE districts to further strengthen the broader programme. Baseline and endline household surveys were conducted in iCCM-eligible areas of RAcE districts. Care-seeking from HSAs and treatment of fever improved over the project period. At endline, however, less than half of sick children were brought to an HSA, many caregivers reported a preference for providers other than HSAs, and perceptions of HSAs as trusted providers of high-quality, convenient care had decreased. HSA supervision and mentorship were below MOH targets. Stockouts of malaria medicines were associated with decreased care-seeking from HSAs. Additional qualitative research is needed to examine challenges and to inform potential solutions. Malawi’s mature iCCM programme has a strong foundation but can be improved to strengthen the continuity of care from communities to facilities and to ultimately improve child health outcomes.

Evidence suggests that disclosure of HIV status between partners may influence prevention of maternal-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) outcomes. We report partner disclosure in relation to maternal antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and adherence, and MTCT among postpartum HIV-infected Malawian women. A cross-sectional mixed-method study was conducted as part of a nationally representative longitudinal cohort study. Between 2014–2016, all (34,637) mothers attending 54 under-5 clinics with their 4–26 week-old infants were approached, of which 98% (33,980) were screened for HIV; infants received HIV-1 DNA testing. HIV-exposure was confirmed in 3,566/33,980 (10.5%). Among 2882 couples, both partners, one partner, and neither partner disclosed to each other in 2090 (72.5%), 622 (21.6%), and 169 (5.9%), respectively. In multivariable models, neither partner disclosing was associated with no maternal ART, suboptimal treatment adherence and MTCT.  

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