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Over the course of the project, African Strategies for Health, in support of USAID/Africa Bureau priorities, has engaged with thought leaders, innovators, and implementers on cutting-edge issues to build capacity and advance collaboration in the use of digital technology to improve health outcomes.

The African Strategies for Health (ASH) project has produced six volumes of the mHealth Compendium containing 167 profiles of mobile health (mHealth) programs. The volumes document key mHealth resources, and describe featured programs and their results, lessons learned, and implementation challenges.

The mHealth Compendium series, developed by the African Strategies for Health project, has expanded the body of knowledge and increased access to the most current information on mobile technology solutions for health.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a growing cause of death and disability in Africa, reducing individual and collective productivity and increasing health care costs. The African region is expected to experience the greatest increase in NCD deaths over the coming decade.

An estimated 1 million children worldwide are infected with tuberculosis (TB) each year, representing about 11 percent of all TB cases.

Reducing the burden of malaria in Uganda is a priority for The National Malaria Control Program. While significant strides have been made, some components have not progressed to the same extent, including addressing malaria in pregnancy. This assessment was undertaken by the ASH project to examine facility-based factors that influence the coverage of IPTp among pregnant women.

With more than 13.3 million mobile users in Angola, there are opportunities to use mHealth solutions to improve quality of care, access to health services, and health outcomes. USAID/Angola commissioned the African Strategies for Health Project to conduct a landscape analysis of mHealth in Angola, and develop a business case to determine opportunities and barriers for USAID investment.

Abstract Background: To ascertain equity in financing for essential medicines and health supplies (EMHS) in Uganda, this paper explores the relationships among government funding allocations for EMHS, patient load, and medicines availability across facilities at different levels of care.

Abstract The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi was based on a public health approach adapted to its resource-poor setting, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful tuberculosis control framework. From 2004 to 2015, the number of new patients started on ART increased from about 3,000 to over 820,000.

Abstract Purpose: Active surveillance pharmacovigilance systems better estimate the burden of adverse events (AEs) and can generate useful information on risk factors of AEs for more effective medicine use, especially in conjunction with introduction of new medicines and/or changes in treatment guidelines.

Abstract Introduction: Active surveillance pharmacovigilance is a systematic approach to medicine safety assessment and health systems strengthening, but has not been widely implemented in low- and middle-income countries.

Abstract Background: One of the main goals of the post-2015 global tuberculosis (TB) strategy is that no families affected by TB face catastrophic costs. We revised an existing TB patient cost measurement tool to specifically also measure multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB patients’ costs and applied it in Ethiopia, Indonesia and Kazakhstan.

In 2003, the government  of Tanzania introduced the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO) program to improve access to good-quality medicines in rural and peri-urban areas that have frequent drug shortages in public health facilities and few or no registered pharmacies. However, increasing access may also contribute to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) due to the potential overuse and misuse of drugs. We conducted a cross-sectional household survey in four regions in mainland Tanzania to characterize consumer care-seeking habits and medicines use and to determine the extent to which members of the community are knowledgeable about antimicrobials and AMR. We revealed that communities in the four regions have low levels of knowledge of the concepts of antimicrobials and their use and AMR. Level of public understanding rose with wealth status and education. Only one-third of 1,200 respondents (33.6%) had ever heard of a medicine called an antimicrobial, and 5–15% could name at least one antimicrobial spontaneously. Some thought other medicines, such as paracetamol, were antimicrobial (7.5%). People were equally likely to agree that pneumonia should be treated with an antimicrobial (21.4%) as well as common cold (28.4%). Understanding of AMR risks was better, particularly related to HIV and AIDS (32.2%) and malaria (38.6%)—most likely due to information campaigns focused on those two diseases. The level of knowledge decreased the further away respondents lived from an ADDO and where ADDO density was lower, which supports the use of ADDO dispensers as sources of community information and change agents for more appropriate medicine use. Lack of knowledge about antimicrobials and AMR in Tanzanian communities needs to be addressed through multi-pronged strategies that focus on prescribers and the public— especially those who are poorer and less educated.

Nearly 16 million girls ages 15-19 give birth annually, almost all of them in developing countries. Pregnancy and childbirth-related complications are the leading cause of death among adolescent girls, contributing to maternal and child mortality rates and to the vicious cycle of poverty and poor health.

African regional organizations play critical roles in advancing health and development agendas. To enhance understanding of the contributions and role of regional bodies engaged in health in Africa, the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project reviewed the evidence on regionalization and the relationships, strategic advantages, and limitations of regional actors. 

El manual desenvolvido por FCI con el apoyo de la División para América Latina y el Caribe del Fondo de Poblacíon de las Naciones Unidas (UNFPA) incluye las notas para facilitación, el contenido de presentaciones en power point sobre los temas, y sugerencias para trabajos en grupo que ayuden a fortaceler las habilidades de las personas participantes en proyetos que cont

Estos diagnósticos recogen el proceso y los resultados de los talleres nacionales participativos realizados en Perú, Bolivia y Ecuador en el marco del proyecto "Mujer Indígena: Salud y Derechos".

“Mujeres indígenas: derechos sexuales y derechos reproductivos” pretende dar respuesta a la demanda informativa expresada por las mujeres indígenas de Ecuador y sus organizaciones, acerca de sus derechos sexuales y reproductivos, que están vigentes y garantizados por la Constitución de 2008 y a otras leyes que, además, se estructuran tomando en cuenta

Elaboradas en forma participativa con las mujeres indígenas de Bolivia, estas siete cartillas son una herramienta creada para fortalecer sus conocimientos acerca de las leyes y la normativa relacionada a su salud y sus derechos sexuales y reproductivos y las formas de asegurar su cumplimiento y de acceder a los servicios de salud.

Developed by FCI, the Ministry of Health of Ecuador, and the Quality Assurance Project (QAP) this manual facilitates a process to adapt delivery care to cultural expectations.

La publicación "Jóvenes y derechos: mensajes para incidir en la esfera pública" es una herramienta para aquellos grupos, organizaciones o personas que quieran dedicarse a hacer abogacía por el ejercicio de los derechos reproductivos, y en particular para la prevención del embarazo no deseado en adolescentes.

Horizontes interculturales en salud y VIH es una aproximación al enfoque intercultural en las políticas públicas referidas a VIH y pueblos indígenas en Ecuador. Presenta una aproximación conceptual al enfoque intercultural y las políticas públicas; luego recoge datos nacionales sobre VIH, población en general y mujeres indígenas.

Una metodología participativa para evaluar las necesidades insatisfechas en salud sexual y reproductiva de poblaciones jóvenes de áreas rurales e indígenas de América Latina. La metodología promueve el involucramiento de las personas jóvenes en el mapeo de sus necesidades y la identificación de sus prioridades.

Esta  nos da un panorama sobre la situación en materia de salud de los y las jóvenes bolivianos en comunidades indígenas, con énfasis en la salud sexual y reproductiva.

Of all the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), MDG 5 — Improve maternal health — has made the least progress. It is the most underfunded of the health-related MDGs. Globally, the MDGs are widely accepted as the path to ending poverty.

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