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For decades, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been instrumental in developing and conducting pharmaceutical management training in developing countries all over the world. Traditional training approaches often transfer much information in lengthy, intensive sessions and can remove participants from their place of work for a week or more.

The Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program developed this paper to provide US Agency for International Development (USAID) health program managers, country counterparts (including policy makers and health care managers and workers), and other stakeholders with an understanding of how governance issues permeate pharmaceutical management and influence the effectiveness of health programs

From community health workers in Haiti, to drug shop owners in eastern Tanzania, to midwives in western Afghanistan, the impact of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been felt throughout the developing world.

Adoption of the new WHO guidelines would increase the total number of patients on ART in 19 high-patient-load health centers in Addis Ababa and four regions of Ethiopia by about 30%. The shift in the CD4+ threshold for ART initiation will substantially increase the demand for ART in Ethiopia. Since under the current systems only 60% of Ethiopia’s patients in need of ART are receiving the medications, scaling up ART programs to accommodate the increased demand for drugs will not be possible unless government funding and support increase concurrently.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. Within Africa the mobile phone has become ubiquitous, making mHealth applications an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes.

Twelve Stories of How MSH Is Helping Women and Children around the World

Stories of How MSH Is Advancing Health around the World

Treatment as Prevention (TasP) describes HIV prevention methods that use antiretroviral therapy (ART) in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative persons to decrease the risk of HIV transmission.

Positive health, dignity and prevention (PHDP) engages people who know they are living with HIV in prevention. It involves supporting HIV-positive people to learn and practice how to live healthily and minimize the risks of spreading the virus to others.

This technical brief summarizes the latest evidence on PMTCT of HIV in the Southern African region. It presents the current WHO guidance on antiretroviral use in pregnant HIV-positive women: Options A, B and B+. Option B+ is a new development, emerging from experiences in Malawi, which was the focus of much attention at the recent International AIDS Conference.

This technical brief makes the case for understanding behavior change approaches as necessary but insufficient methods of HIV prevention. The document describes how behavior change interventions may be more effective when they are used as part of a  combination prevention approach that is shaped by a social-ecological perspective on HIV prevention.

In 2007, WHO/UNAIDS recommended that male circumcision be considered an important new intervention for HIV prevention, and that countries with a high HIV prevalence, low rates of male circumcision, and heterosexual epidemics should consider scaling up male circumcision as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package.

There is growing awareness that well led and managed global health solutions are required to achieve effective and sustainable health programs, especially at the scale needed to attain Millennium Development Goals and other global targets. This compendium of case studies reviews the current evidence of the impact of leadership and management on health.

We need a dramatic change in thinking—and action from donors, policymakers, and program managers in the public, private, and nongovernmental (NGO) sectors—to focus on strengthening health systems in the countries most affected by HIV & AIDS. To meet the Millennium Development Goal of reversing the epidemic by 2015, we must change how we design and deliver services.

These guidelines provide standards for HIV prevention program implementation for non-governmental organizations and civil society organizations, against which services provided to the target populations can be monitored and evaluated to ensure quality and client satisfaction.

Management Sciences for Health’s Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa Project (BLC) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) have written a series of technical briefs on priority HIV prevention topics.

Prepared by the USAID-funded AIDSTAR-Two project, this situational overview provides a detailed analysis of the response to the epidemic by associations and support groups of people living with HIV in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

This technical brief developed by the AIDSTAR-Two project presents a framework that offers a simplified and systematic approach to organizational capacity building that most local implementers, especially those that provide HIV and AIDS services, can draw from to better fulfill or expand their mandates.

Africa is the fastest growing continent in the world— with a projected average economic growth rate of 6 percent from 2013-2015. Health is becoming increasingly important as economies grow. This brief explores the relationship between health, economic development and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa by reviewing available evidence taken from published research and data.

On November 12, 2009, Uganda’s Honorable Minister of Health, Dr.

A guide to evaluate whether health information products and services meet the requirements needed to make them effective, used, and adapted by health care practitioners and policymakers in the field.

The Human Resources for Health Action Framework (HAF) was developed by representatives of multilateral and bilateral agencies, donors, partner countries, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the academic community at a technical consultation in Washington, DC, on December 14–15, 2005. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S.

A broken health system is a silent killer. It results in more illness and death despite the fact that the public health and medical knowledge exists to greatly reduce illness and save millions of lives every year, especially in developing countries. What is missing is the leadership capacity to ensure that the management systems are in place to apply and scale up this knowledge.

This quarterly bulletin provides information on the activities of the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP). Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health, IHSPP combines evidence-based approaches, proven service delivery strategies, and extensive public health expertise to support the Rwandan Ministry of Health in building its health system. In this issue:

The themes emerging from this collection are straightforward and within our grasp. To be sure, there is an urgent need to strengthen earlier diagnosis of newborns to identify exposed and infected children and strategies for getting those children into HIV care and treatment services sooner than has been the norm.

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