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For decades, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been instrumental in developing and conducting pharmaceutical management training in developing countries all over the world. Traditional training approaches often transfer much information in lengthy, intensive sessions and can remove participants from their place of work for a week or more.

The Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program developed this paper to provide US Agency for International Development (USAID) health program managers, country counterparts (including policy makers and health care managers and workers), and other stakeholders with an understanding of how governance issues permeate pharmaceutical management and influence the effectiveness of health programs

FinMAT helps managers assess their organizations’ financial management capacity, identify areas for improvement, make specific action plans to address shortcomings, and monitor for improvement The heart of FinMAT is an instrument for collecting and summarizing technical information about an organization’s financial management systems and practices.

HOSPICAL: A Tool for Allocating Hospital Costs can help improve a hospital’s performance and enhance its financial sustainability. Managers who use this practical tool will find it a tremendous aid in analyzing current costs and revenues, comparing efficiency, and forecasting what those figures would be if hospital services are expanded or modified.

Proper stock management is essential for providing medicines to patients when and where they need them. This is especially important for people living with HIV because treatment is a lifelong commitment and adherence is critical to good outcomes. Pharmacists must be able to track, analyze, and manage stock information to prevent stock-outs, overstocks, and stock expiring on the shelf.

In Namibia, Togo, and 10 other countries, MSH pioneered the Electronic Dispensing Tool, a cutting-edge information system that uses the patient as the focal point and captures critical information needed to make decisions about an individual’s drug regimen, as well as stock inventory and aggregate patient statistics. How it's used

In 2011, MSH was named a Top 40 Development Innovator by DevEx, one of the largest networks of international development professionals.

From community health workers in Haiti, to drug shop owners in eastern Tanzania, to midwives in western Afghanistan, the impact of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been felt throughout the developing world.

The first management book written specifically for family planning program managers, this award-winning handbook has become a standard text in management training courses around the world.A practical guide for managers of health and family planning programs, this handbook provides practical information on:planningcoordinationstaffingsupervisiontrainingmanagement informationcontraceptive logisticsf

Managers everywhere need specific solutions to the critical challenges facing public health and development programs.

In a world of rising health care costs and increasing health care needs, access to tested approaches and techniques in the management of health care is more vital than ever. This compendium offers practical tools and techniques to address current challenges in public health management.

A cross-sectional study conducted in two states of India during 2006-08 found a disconnect between routine antenatal practices in India and known strategies to prevent and treat malaria in pregnancy. Prevention strategies, in particular the use of insecticide-treated bednets, are underutilized.

Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO) was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs.

In 2008, The Roll Back Malaria partnership issued guidelines for inclusion of pharmacovigilance in Global Fund and other related proposals. In light of this recommendation and the rapid scale-up of ACT worldwide, an analysis of Global Fund Round 8 proposals and the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) 2009 Malaria Operational Plans was conducted to assess if and how pharmacovigilance has been incorporated into countries' national malaria plans and donor budget requests.

Background: Delay in Tuberculosis (TB) case detection may worsen the disease and increase TB transmission. It is also a challenge to the National TB and Leprosy control Program (NTLP).Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in four out of six districts in Pwani region to estimate the extent and factors responsible for delay in TB case detection in Pwani region.

This review aimed to document evidence on access to effective malaria treatment in Kenya, identify factors that influence access, and make recommendations on how to improve prompt access to effective malaria treatment. Since treatment-seeking patterns for malaria are similar in many settings in sub Saharan Africa, the findings presented in this review have important lessons for other malaria endemic countries.

Given the large population at risk, a cross sectional study was conducted in order to better define the burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand, a malaria-endemic state in central-east India.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) case detection in women has remained low in developing world. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of smear positive TB among women with cough regardless of the duration attending family Planning (FP) and Maternal and child health (MCH) clinics in Dar es Salaam.Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in all three municipal hospital

This assessment of health information needs, conducted in the capital city and 3 districts of Malawi in 2009, showed the need to build the capacity of government technical working groups to collect and store information and promote information exchange; improve information synthesis and packaging; strengthen the district level to serve as an information hub; and explore the use of mobile technologies.

A demonstration project (January 2010 to June 2011) in Malawi improved the exchange and use of family planning/reproductive health and HIV/AIDS knowledge among health workers using a short message service (SMS) network.

Despite lower levels of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) stock-outs compared to the reports in 2008, the stock-outs at Kenyan facilities during 2010-2011 are still substantial and of particular worry for the most detrimental: simultaneous absence of any AL pack. Only minor decrease was observed in the stock-outs of individual AL packs. Recently launched interventions to eliminate AL stock-outs in Kenya are fully justified.

This article is the lead article in the Human Resources for Health journal's first quarterly feature. The series of seven articles was contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) under the theme of leadership and management in public health. The journal invited Dr. Manuel M. Dayrit, Director of the WHO Department of Human Resources for Health and former Minister of Health for the Philippines, to launch the feature with an opening editorial in the journal's blog. This opening article describes the human resource challenges that managers around the world report and analyses why solutions often fail to be implemented. The case studies in this issue were chosen to illustrate results from using the Leadership Development Program (LDP) at different levels of the health sector. The LDP makes a profound difference in health managers' attitudes towards their work. Rather than feeling defeated by a workplace climate that lacks motivation, hope, and commitment to change, people report that they are mobilized to take action to change the status quo. The lesson is that without this capacity at all levels, global policy and national HR strategies will fail to make a difference.

Background: International initiatives such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the President's Malaria Initiative have significantly increased availability and access to medicines in some parts of the developing world. Despite this, however, skills remain limited on quantifying needs for medications and order

As part of the special feature on leadership and human resources, Management Sciences for Health profiles three leaders who have made a significance difference in the HR situation in their countries.

Despite a pool of unemployed health staff available in Kenya, staffing levels at most facilities were only 50%, and maldistribution of staff left many people without access to antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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