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To ensure that the inspection of retail pharmacies is carried out with good standard, MOPH initiated the development of the retail pharmacies inspection checklist to guide the inspectors.

To ensure that the inspection of pharmaceutical wholesalers is carried out with good standard, MOPH initiated the development of the wholesalers’ inspection checklist to guide the inspectors.

To ensure that the inspection of pharmaceutical importers is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of the pharmaceutical importers inspection checklist user manual.

To ensure that the inspection of retail pharmacies is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of a user manual for the retail pharmacies inspection checklist.

To ensure that the inspection of wholesalers is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of a user manual for the wholesalers’ inspection checklist.

This is the overall policy document for Waste Management and Safe Disposal of Pharmaceutical system for Afghanistan’s pharmaceutical sector. The goal of this document is to provide a comprehensive waste disposal system for medicines so as to ensure their safe destruction in a cost-effective and efficient manner; and to do this whilst also providing full protection of the environment.

This document is the overall policy for the product quality assurance (QA) system for Afghanistan’s pharmaceutical sector. This policy, the National Pharmaceutical Quality Assurance Policy, is part of continuous efforts by the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and stakeholders to ensure the safety, efficaciousness, and quality of medicines.

This framework seeks to outline a national strategy for the development of pharmaceutical HR in the public and private sectors in Afghanistan to produce a stronger pharmaceutical system that responds to the population’s needs. In particular, the framework serves as a reference document for the Human Resources for Health plan and the HR section of the National Medicines Policy of the MoPH.

This document aims to present a concept for the establishment of an independent NMHRA in the country, through which the regulatory activities of various MoPH authorities are coordinated and incorporated so that it is ensured that medical products are of a better quality and that the medicines consumed in the country are safe.

The National Medicine Board was established in 2003 and then it was promoted to the National Medicines & Food Board (NMFB) in 2009. According to the Medicine Law (2008), the Board is the highest decision making entity on issues related to pharmaceuticals. Upon its expansion in 2009, the Board’s mandate was extended to include foodstuff.

The world loses 300,000 women and nearly 5 million children to preventable causes each year. Millions of women in low-resource settings lack proper antenatal care, give birth without a skilled attendant, and don't receive postpartum care.

In order to fight against future epidemics, the world must take action to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease outbreaks.   

Studies have shown that the role of a midwife before, during and after delivery can play a crucial role in preventing cross-infection between mother and baby. Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT) remains a serious threat, particularly with Zika and HIV viruses. Midwives have the power to change that. 

Once an outbreak becomes an epidemic, the costs - both human and financial - on health systems are extensive and debilitating. 

The list of 10 Core tests in each country includes six testing methods selected according to the International Health Regulations' immediately notifiable list and the WHO Top Ten Causes of Death in low-income countries. 

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to help build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security as a national and global priority. Find out more about the GHSA Action Packages, visit: https://www.ghsagenda.org/ 

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to help build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security as a national and global priority. Find out more about the GHSA, visit: https://www.ghsagenda.org/ 

Over half a billion people have died in epidemics over the last century and most experts agree another epidemic is not a matter of if, but a matter of when. Are you ready? This one page summary of Ready Together was presented at the 2017 Conference on Epidemic Preparedness held at Harvard Medical School.  

Between May and July of 2015, South Korea experienced an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, that lead to 38 deaths and seriously affected the country's economy. 

The No More Epidemics campaign held its final event on November 13, 2017—the Ready Together Conference on Epidemic Preparedness, hosted in partnership with Harvard Medical School, Georgetown University’s Center for Global Health Science and Security, Harvard Global Health Institute, and the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation.

 Although international guidelines for tuberculosis (TB) control are standardized, country TB programs are often unable to properly manage the data needed for following the guidelines, resulting in poorly timed interventions. The emergence of drug-resistant (DR-TB) has made it more difficult to manage cases and medicines, increasing the need for tools that effectively monitor diagnosing

This 4-page brochure on health systems strengthening describes how MSH partners with countries to build strong, resilient, sustainable health systems that can deliver universal health coverage—equitable, affordable access to high-quality health services for all who need them.

In his new book, 'The End of Epidemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It,' Dr. Johnathan D. Quick, a Harvard Medical School faculty member and Chair of the Global Health Council, examines the eradication of smallpox and devastating effects of influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola.

Since the 1990s, the Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settings (IAFM) has provided authoritative guidance on reproductive health service provision during different phases of complex humanitarian emergencies. In 2018, the Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises will release a new edition of this global resource. In this article, we describe the collaborative and inter-sectoral revision process and highlight major changes in the 2018 IAFM. We conclude with an outline of plans for releasing the 2018 IAFM and facilitating uptake by those working in refugee, crisis, conflict, and emergency settings.

In 2011 the Help Ethiopia Address the Low TB Performance (HEAL TB) Project used WHO or national TB indicators as standards of care (SOC) for baseline assessment, progress monitoring, gap identification, assessment of health workers’ capacity-building needs, and data quality assurance. In this analysis we present results from 10 zones (of 28) in which 1,165 health facilities were supported from 2011 through 2015. The improvement in the median composite score of 13 selected major indicators (out of 22) over four years was significant. The proportion of health facilities with 100% data accuracy for all forms of TB was 55.1% at baseline and reached 96.5%. In terms of program performance, the TB cure rate improved from 71% to 91.1%, while the treatment success rate increased from 88% to 95.3%. In the laboratory area, where there was previously no external quality assurance (EQA) for sputum microscopy, 1,165 health facilities now have quarterly EQA, and 96.1% of the facilities achieved a ≥ 95% concordance rate in blinded rechecking. The SOC approach for supervision was effective for measuring progress, enhancing quality of services, identifying capacity needs, and serving as a mentorship and an operational research tool.

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