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The number of new TB cases has been declining steadily worldwide in recent years. However, the burden remains high among low-income and marginalized populations.

Half of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) go undetected and therefore untreated. TB is often considered a curse rather than a curable disease, and few consult health workers about it until they become incapacitated. Bringing information into the home is critical. Once a community understands TB, they tend to tell others who are coughing to go to the hospital.

More than 50 MSH staff from the home and country offices traveled to Cape Town, South Africa to participate in the 46th Union World Conference on Lung Health December 2-6, 2015. MSH, along with the USAID-funded, MSH-led Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, co-hosted four workshops, and presented 22 posters, 7 oral presentations and 7 symposiums.

This publication shares stories from the Strengthening TB and HIV & AIDS Responses in Eastern Uganda (STAR-E) project. STAR-E is a key partner with the government of Uganda in scaling up HIV and TB services. When the project began in 2009, STAR-E supported just 16 health facilities, with only one that provided antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Harmoniser les services de santé : Sauver des vies grâce à l’intégration des programmes de santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale et infantile avec ceux relatifs au VIH/SIDA, à la tuberculose et au paludisme (French title)

The USAID-funded African Strategies for Health (ASH) project undertook this childhood TB landscape analysis, to expand and centralize available information on childhood TB in Africa.

To better understand whether childhood TB guidelines can inform the roles and responsibilities of maternal and child health providers and to identify opportunities for strengthening them, USAID's Africa and Global Health Bureaus and the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project assessed existing childhood TB guidelines in 13 countries in Africa.

The African continent has seen pronounced movement toward regionalism in recent years. Regional bodies are actively contributing to the development of many sectors, including health.

An estimated 1 million children worldwide are infected with tuberculosis (TB) each year, representing about 11 percent of all TB cases.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). An estimated 60,000 new cases arise yearly, with 110,000 Afghans now living with TB; 14,000 Afghans died from the disease in 2015. Only about two in three presumed patients are found, and the treatment success rate is only 49 percent on average in the country.

From 2011–16, the HEAL TB project supported Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) in Amhara and Oromia regions to improve comprehensive TB services, including finding and treating TB in children, adults, and special populations; expanding multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) diagnosis and treatment; integrating TB and HIV services; improving laboratory diagnostics and reporting; and s

While TB is a national and international priority, Ethiopia's high TB rates were not declining rapidly in the 2000s. From 2011-16, USAID funded a project to support the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) to dramatically improve TB services and outcomes in Oromia and Amhara Regions. Its formal name is "Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance," or HEAL-TB.

While TB is a national and international priority, Ethiopia's high TB rates were not declining rapidly in the 2000s. From 2011-16, USAID funded a project to support the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) to dramatically improve TB services and outcomes in Oromia and Amhara Regions. Its formal name is "Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance," or HEAL-TB.

While TB is a national and international priority, Ethiopia’s high TB rates were not declining rapidly in the 2000s. From 2011-16, USAID funded a project to support the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) to dramatically improve TB services and outcomes in Oromia and Amhara Regions. Its formal name is “Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance,” or HEAL-TB.

While TB is a national and international priority, Ethiopia's high TB rates were not declining rapidly in the 2000s. From 2011-16, USAID funded a project to support the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) to dramatically improve TB services and outcomes in Oromia and Amhara Regions. Its formal name is "Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance," or HEAL-TB.

While TB is a national and international priority, Ethiopia's high TB rates were not declining rapidly in the 2000s. From 2011-16, USAID funded a project to support the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) to dramatically improve TB services and outcomes in Oromia and Amhara Regions. Its formal name is "Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance," or HEAL-TB.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Through the Challenge TB project, MSH’s work contributes to USAID’s goal of a world free of TB as part of its End TB Strategy, which seeks to reduce TB mortality by 35 percent and reduce incidence levels by 20 percent by 2019.

This brief provides details on the achievements, challenges, and lessons learned from the TRACK TB project's Urban DOTS component. TRACK TB works to strengthen the capacity of the National TB/Leprosy Programme in Uganda, to provide leadership for TB response, and deliver quality, well-organized, and efficient services in close collaboration with other USAID programs.   

This collection of stories represents some of the lifesaving work of USAID, Ethiopia's federal ministry of health, and the HEAL TB project.

Last year, tuberculosis (TB) killed more people than did HIV and AIDS—becoming the world's deadliest single infectious agent. More than 95 percent of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, especially those with weak health systems.

Final Report: Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance (HEAL TB) Project 2011–2016

The Care and Treatment for Sustained Support (CaTSS) project applies Nigeria’s test and treat approach to achieve the UNAIDS 90-90-90 goals.

Human resources for health challenges related to training, deploying, and sustaining an effective health workforce have remained a barrier to successful program implementation at different levels of the health system.As health facilities are now required to treat all identi ed HIV positive clients in line with the newTest and Treat guidelines for achieving the UNAIDS 90:90:90 goals, addressin

To improve quality of HIV care in targeted districts, STAR-E scaled up the Ministery of Health quality improvement framework in March 2013. STAR-E targeted 66 facilities, including high volume and smaller facilities that were underperforming on key indicators.

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