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THE United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded TB CARE I has stepped up tuberculosis awareness and case detection in the country by providing technical assistance to the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Programme (NTBLCP).

Developing and distributing TB case detection SOPs, followed by staff training, mentoring, and supervision, minimizes missed opportunities and improves TB case detection in health facilities. TB CARE I strongly recommends scaling up this intervention to other zones and regions to improve TB case detection and TB/HIV care in the country

This poster demonstrates that Urban DOTS helped to significantly improve TB treatment outcomes in Kabul city and recommends that Urban DOTS should be expanded in similar settings to improve TB case detection and treatment outcomes by engaging both the private and public sectors in DOTS implementation.

This Power Point presents the community-based DOTS (CB-DOST) approach that applied in Afghanistan from 2009 to 2012 and reviews results from community health workers’ (CHWs) contribution to TB patients' treatment adherence through community-based DOTS.  

Impact of TB Infection Control Implementation on Health Workers in Afghanistan, 2011

This poster concludes: Health facilities implementing IPLS experienced lower TB drug stock out than those health facilities not implementing IPLS. Scale up and continuous follow up of IPLS implementation is recommended.  Expanding and sustaining IPLS in Ethiopia will require: Training all health facility staff on IPLS implementation;

The purpose of this guide is to provide a step-by-step approach reviewing the most critical areas of pharmaceutical management for tuberculosis. With the guide, users should be able to identify key weaknesses in their system and mechanisms to overcome weaknesses in selection, procurement, distribution, timely use, and management support of TB medicines.

In most countries, tuberculosis (TB) services are decentralized up to the most peripheral health facilities and often into the community. On the other hand, HIV/AIDS services are generally much more centralized because scale-up of services, especially of antiretroviral therapy (ART), started only quite recently.

This poster concludes: By developing an EQA (external quality assurance) system and disseminating associated documents and tools, training staff, and providing feedback and site visits, TB CARE I significantly strengthened the quality and reliability of TB laboratory results in Kenya. 

MOST for TB Management and Organizations Sustainability Tool for National TB Control Programs: A Guide for Users and Facilitators

Changing Malaria Treatment Policy to Artemisinin-Based Combinations: An Implementation Guide This document provides guidance to countries on implementing national policy changes to ACT for first-line malaria treatment consistent with the World Health Organization's (WHO) policy recommendations.

RPM Plus works in several countries globally to help enhance pharmaceutical management systems and improve access to high-quality antimalarial medicines and commodities. Read more about RPM Plus' work in the malaria brochure.

Background: Delay in Tuberculosis (TB) case detection may worsen the disease and increase TB transmission. It is also a challenge to the National TB and Leprosy control Program (NTLP).Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in four out of six districts in Pwani region to estimate the extent and factors responsible for delay in TB case detection in Pwani region.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) case detection in women has remained low in developing world. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of smear positive TB among women with cough regardless of the duration attending family Planning (FP) and Maternal and child health (MCH) clinics in Dar es Salaam.Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in all three municipal hospital

Of 48 surveyed hospitals and health centers in Ethiopia, 9 (19%), 9 (19%), and 10 (21%) did not have malaria, TB, or HIV drugs, respectively. Similarly, of 27 health posts, 9 (33%) and 6 (22%) did not have rapid diagnostic tests and antimalarial drugs, respectively. The findings indicated an inadequate availability of essential drugs and commodities in the surveyed facilities as well as weaknesses in human resources and training.

In developing countries, particularly in Africa, the provision of health services leans heavily towards today’s epidemics, including HIV and AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. This calls for different approaches to the implementation of interventions from a public health perspective.

As HIV care services continue to scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa, adequate tuberculosis diagnostic capacity is vital to reduce mortality among HIV-infected persons.

A poster presented at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

A presentation delivered at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  Presentation Outline Background ChallengestoimplementingTBservices Interventionsapplied Results and lessons learned Recommendations Conclusion   

The cost of scaling up the TB Control Program in Indonesia The economic burden of tuberculosis in Indonesia Policy options and levers for financing TB services in Indonesia Lessons learned from a global approach to strengthening monitoring and evaluation efforts in national TB programs

This compendium is for the use of national TB program staff in high burden settings who are trying to identify strategies to reach at-risk and vulnerable communities more effectively it contains very summarized descriptions of over 120 approaches to reach and serve at-risk and vulnerable populations, and links to over 650 tools and reference materials.

In recent years, there has been a shift in how the international community is addressing the HIV epidemic. As more people are receiving antiretroviral therapy, we are seeing the benefits of reduced viral load on a population level. Fewer babies are being born HIV positive and prevalence rates are dropping in most countries with the highest HIV burdens.

In response to the HIV and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics, we build the capacity of our public- and private-sector partners to prevent TB and HIV and improve diagnosis and management of co-infected patients.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health partnered with the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP) to strengthen and coordinate its health information system. In 2009, when IHSSP was launched, the ministry had multiple systems to gather data from the country’s health services, but the systems used to aggregate and analyze the information were weak and were not interoperable.

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