Resources

Results 1201 - 1225 of 1324

Making foundational changes to the way people receive their health care requires an understanding of the whole system, from economics to environment, government to community, and hospital to community health worker. The work that is required, often behind the scenes, to ensure someone receives the right medicine, the right diagnosis, and the right support is as complex as it is essential.

Year Ended June 30, 2019, drawn from audited financial statements.

Nigeria has the largest population in Africa, now exceeding 200 million, and is home to 25% of the world’s malaria burden. As a sub-recipient to Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is a partner to the government of Nigeria in combating malaria.

Please download to read the USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity in Ukraine News Digest, February 2020 edition. 

This research brief highlights excerpts of findings from a study conducted by the USAID-funded Leadership, Management, and Governance and Evidence to Action Projects in Cameroon.The study took place at two hospitals in Yaoundé, Cameroon, from October 2014-September 2015, and studied the effect of combining a leadership development program with clinical training to improve postpartum family

Health policy makers, program designers and implementers, and public health practitioners are often not aware of how to promote good governance and may not have the tools to influence governing bodies and their governance decisions.As strategic management tools, roadmaps force deep thinking, explain where teams are going, and subsequently help everyone stay on track.

In Benin, gender-based violence (GBV) survivors can access an integrated package of services, including medical and psychosocial care, by visiting one of the country’s One Stop GBV centers, located in the cities of Cotonou, Parakou, and Abomey. However, GBV survivors who live in other regions might be unable to access these services due to financial and other barriers.

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health.The goal of the program is to accelerate sustainable health impacts for the Malagasy population through three primary objectives:• Quality healt

On March 4, 2020, staff from the MSH-led ONSE Health Activity in Malawi presented recent results and lessons learned on strengthening malaria services through Outreach Training and Supportive Supervision (OTSS).

The MSH International Medical Products Price Guide website is undergoing maintenance and will be back online as soon as possible.

Infectious disease outbreaks devastate communities and cost the world $60 billion a year in response efforts—matching the toll of wars and natural disasters in terms of economic impact and lives lost. Local preparedness is the key to stopping outbreaks at the source.

Ethiopia is among the high-burden countries for tuberculosis (TB), TB/HIV, and drug-resistant TB. The aim of this nationwide study was to better understand TB-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) and generate evidence for policy and decision-making. Of 3,503 participants, 884 (24.4%), 836 (24.1%), and 1,783 (51.5%) were TB patients, families of TB patients, and the general population, respectively. The mean age was 34.3 years, and 50% were women. Forty-six percent were heads of households, 32.1% were illiterate, 20.3% were farmers, and 19.8% were from the lowest quintile. The majority (95.5%) had heard about TB, but only 25.8% knew that TB is caused by bacteria. The majority (85.3%) knew that TB could be cured. Most Ethiopians have a high level of awareness about TB and seek care in public health facilities, and communities are generally supportive. Inadequate knowledge about TB transmission, limited engagement of community health workers, and low preference for using community health workers were the key challenges.

As a recent international conference initiated and hosted by Afghanistan showed, there is no substitute for collaborative action fuelled by a common vision – and when it comes to eradicating the six deadliest diseases in the world today (HIV/AIDS, malaria, cholera, polio, tuberculosis and avian influenza), political boundaries and territorial conflicts become irrelevant.

Purpose: The purpose of this manual is to provide a set of flexible, adaptable tools, and guidelines to support supervisors in their role of improving the quality of care in the clinics. It is especially helpful for focusing managers on the key elements of integrated primary health care as they simultaneously integrate new interventions for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.Description:

This tool, developed in partnership with Stop TB/WHO and the World Bank, assists DOTS programs in identifying performance problems; underlying stakeholder motivations that may contribute to those problems; and potential incentives, enablers, and system improvements that can address motivational challenges. 

The essential medicines concept has become an established approach in international public health – a vital component for combating HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, respiratory infections, other communicable diseases and the vast majority of non-communicable diseases. But the survival and global dissemination of the essential medicines concept were by no means assured at the outset.  

La Herramienta de Administración y Sustentabilidad Organizacional para Programas Nacionales de Control de la TB (MOST para la TB) es un proceso para mejorar la administración de un PNCT, cuyo resultado final es contribuir a lograr los tres objetivos principales de los PNCT.

The debate on the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health system strengthening in the last few years has intensified as experts seek to tease out common ground and find solutions and synergies to bridge the divide. Unfortunately, the debate continues to be largely academic and devoid of specificity, resulting in the issues being irrelevant to health care workers on the ground.

To explore the process, major players and procedural success factors for recent public sector TB regimen changes, we conducted 166 interviews of country stakeholders in 21 of the 22 TB high-burden countries (HBCs).Stakeholders described 40 distinct regimen changes for drug-susceptible TB. Once countries committed to considering a change, the average timing was ∼1 year for decision-making and ∼2 years for roll-out. Stakeholders more often cited concerns that were program-based (e.g., logistics and cost) rather than patient-focused (e.g., side effects), and patient representatives were seldom part of decision making. Decision-making bodies in higher-income HBCs had more formalized procedures and fewer international participants. Pilot studies focused on logistics were more common than effectiveness studies, and the evidence base was often felt to be insufficient. Once implementation started, weaknesses in drug management were often exposed, with additional complications if local manufacturing was required. Best practices for regimen change included early engagement of budgeting staff, procurement staff, regulators and manufacturers. Future decision makers will benefit from strengthened decision-making bodies, patient input, early and comprehensive planning, and regimens and evidence that address local, practical implementation issues.

Background: The current tuberculosis (TB) treatment landscape has been studied extensively, but researchers rarely consider how it creates challenges or opportunities for future regimen change.

In Malawi, high case fatality rates in patients with tuberculosis, who were also co-infected with HIV, and high early death rates in people living with HIV during the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adversely impacted on treatment outcomes for the national tuberculosis and ART programmes respectively. This article (1) discusses the operational research that was conducted in the country on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, (2) outlines the steps that were taken to translate these findings into national policy and practice, (3) shows how the implementation of cotrimoxazole preventive therapy for both TB patients and HIV-infected patients starting ART was associated with reduced death rates, and (4) highlights lessons applicable to other settings and interventions.

Pages