Resources

Results 1351 - 1367 of 1367

Nigeria has the largest population in Africa, now exceeding 200 million, and is home to 25% of the world’s malaria burden. As a sub-recipient to Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is a partner to the government of Nigeria in combating malaria.

The objective of this study was to describe the conceptual and implementation approach of selected digital health technologies that were tailored in various resource-constrained countries. Drawing from our multi-year institutional experience in more than 20 high disease-burden countries that aspire to meet the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, we screened internal project documentation on various digital health tools that provide clarity in the conceptual and implementation approach. Taking into account geographic diversity, we provide a descriptive review of five selected case studies from Bangladesh (Asia), Mali (Francophone Africa), Uganda (East Africa), Mozambique (Lusophone Africa), and Namibia (Southern Africa). A key lesson learned is to harness and build on existing governance structures. The use of data for decision-making at all levels needs to be cultivated and sustained through multi-stakeholder partnerships. The next phase of information management development is to build systems for triangulation of data from patients, commodities, geomapping, and other parameters of the pharmaceutical system. A well-defined research agenda must be developed to determine the effectiveness of the country- and regional-level dashboards as an early warning system to mitigate stock-outs and wastage of medicines and commodities.

The response to emergency public health challenges such as HIV, TB, and malaria has been successful in mobilising resources and scaling up treatment for communicable diseases. However, many of the remaining challenges in improving access to and appropriate use of medicines and services require pharmaceutical systems strengthening. Incorporating pharmaceutical systems strengthening into global health programmes requires recognition of a few ‘truths’. Systems strengthening is a lengthy and resource-intensive process that requires sustained engagement, which may not align with the short time frame for achieving targets in vertical-oriented programmes. Further, there is a lack of clarity on what key metrics associated with population and patient level outcomes should be tracked for systems strengthening interventions. This can hinder advocacy and communication with decision makers regarding health systems investments. Moving forward, it is important to find ways to balance the inherent tensions between the short-term focus on the efficiency of vertical programmes and broader, longer-term health and development objectives. Global health programme design should also shift away from a narrow view of medicines primarily as an input commodity to a more comprehensive view that recognizes the various structures and processes and their interactions within the broader health system that help ensure access to and appropriate use of medicines and related services.

Please download to read the USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity in Ukraine News Digest, June 2020 edition. 

Using an effective intervention and district-led approach to strengthen medicine management in government and private not-for-profit health facilities, Supervision, Performance Assessment, and Recognition Strategy (SPARS), the Uganda Health Supply Chain (UHSC) project strengthened the capacity of district health workers to effectively manage and utilize health commodities and promoted local owners

Access to appropriate, high-quality medicines where and when they are needed is the overall goal of a well functioning supply chain and responsive health system.

To ensure an uninterrupted supply of essential medicines and effectively monitor store management in health facilities, the Uganda Ministry of Health (MoH) chose RxSolution, an integrated pharmaceutical management software.

A good health system ensures equitable and consistent access to quality essential medicines and health supplies. Health equity is prioritized in Uganda’s National Medicines Policy but unequal resource allocation has resulted in some health facilities having insufficient resources to meet local health needs.

This is a mixed method cross-sectional study conducted in seven regions and two city administrations. We used multistage cluster sampling to randomly select 40 health centers and interviewed 21 TB patients per health center. We also conducted qualitative interviews to understand the reasons for delay. Of the total 844 TB patients enrolled, the median (IQR) patient, diagnostic and treatment initiation delays were 21 (10–45), 4 (2–10) and 2 (1–3) days respectively. The median (IQR) of total delay was 33 (19–67) days; 72.3% (595) of the patients started treatment after 21 days of the onset of the first symptom. TB patients’ delay in seeking care remains a challenge due to limited community interventions, cost of seeking care, prolonged diagnostics and treatment initiation. Therefore, targeted community awareness creation, cost reduction strategies and improving diagnostic capacity are vital to reduce delay in seeking TB care in Ethiopia.

Despite efforts to find and treat TB, about four million cases were missed globally in 2017. Barriers to accessing health care, inadequate health-seeking behavior of the community, poor socioeconomic conditions, and stigma are major determinants of this gap. This is the first national stigma survey conducted in seven regions and two city administrations of Ethiopia. A total of 3463 participants (844 TB patients, 836 from their families, and 1783 from the general population) were enrolled for the study. More than a third of Ethiopians have high scores for TB-related stigma, which were associated with educational status, poverty, and lack of awareness about TB. Stigma matters in TB prevention, care, and treatment and warrants stigma reduction interventions.

BackgroundTuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem. Its magnitude the required interventions are affected by changes in socioeconomic condition and urbanization. Ethiopia is among the thirty high burden countries with increasing effort to end TB.

Return of Organization Exempt from Income TaxUnder section 501(c), 527, or 4947(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code

The International Medical Products Price Guide (formerly International Drug Price Indicator Guide) contains a spectrum of prices from pharmaceutical suppliers, international development organizations, and government agencies.

Please download to read the USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity in Ukraine News Digest, July 2020 edition.

Public pharmaceutical-sector managers in Uganda previously relied on information gathered from multiple sources to plan for and manage health supplies at the national, district, and facility levels. Not easily accessible, these sources required extensive effort to compile factual, real-time evidence for decision making.

The US has been a global health leader for decades, developing and funding programs for polio eradication, child nutrition, vaccines, HIV and AIDS, malaria, and TB that have saved millions of lives and contributed to increased security and prosperity. Like hundreds of global health development organizations, MSH has partnered with the WHO in ways that are critical to our mission.

The spread of COVID-19 has disrupted lives, communities, and economies worldwide.

Pages