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MOST for TB Management and Organizations Sustainability Tool for National TB Control Programs: A Guide for Users and Facilitators

Changing Malaria Treatment Policy to Artemisinin-Based Combinations: An Implementation Guide This document provides guidance to countries on implementing national policy changes to ACT for first-line malaria treatment consistent with the World Health Organization's (WHO) policy recommendations.

RPM Plus works in several countries globally to help enhance pharmaceutical management systems and improve access to high-quality antimalarial medicines and commodities. Read more about RPM Plus' work in the malaria brochure.

Background: Delay in Tuberculosis (TB) case detection may worsen the disease and increase TB transmission. It is also a challenge to the National TB and Leprosy control Program (NTLP).Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in four out of six districts in Pwani region to estimate the extent and factors responsible for delay in TB case detection in Pwani region.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) case detection in women has remained low in developing world. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of smear positive TB among women with cough regardless of the duration attending family Planning (FP) and Maternal and child health (MCH) clinics in Dar es Salaam.Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study in all three municipal hospital

Of 48 surveyed hospitals and health centers in Ethiopia, 9 (19%), 9 (19%), and 10 (21%) did not have malaria, TB, or HIV drugs, respectively. Similarly, of 27 health posts, 9 (33%) and 6 (22%) did not have rapid diagnostic tests and antimalarial drugs, respectively. The findings indicated an inadequate availability of essential drugs and commodities in the surveyed facilities as well as weaknesses in human resources and training.

In developing countries, particularly in Africa, the provision of health services leans heavily towards today’s epidemics, including HIV and AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. This calls for different approaches to the implementation of interventions from a public health perspective.

As HIV care services continue to scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa, adequate tuberculosis diagnostic capacity is vital to reduce mortality among HIV-infected persons.

A poster presented at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

A presentation delivered at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  Presentation Outline Background ChallengestoimplementingTBservices Interventionsapplied Results and lessons learned Recommendations Conclusion   

The cost of scaling up the TB Control Program in Indonesia The economic burden of tuberculosis in Indonesia Policy options and levers for financing TB services in Indonesia Lessons learned from a global approach to strengthening monitoring and evaluation efforts in national TB programs

This compendium is for the use of national TB program staff in high burden settings who are trying to identify strategies to reach at-risk and vulnerable communities more effectively it contains very summarized descriptions of over 120 approaches to reach and serve at-risk and vulnerable populations, and links to over 650 tools and reference materials.

In recent years, there has been a shift in how the international community is addressing the HIV epidemic. As more people are receiving antiretroviral therapy, we are seeing the benefits of reduced viral load on a population level. Fewer babies are being born HIV positive and prevalence rates are dropping in most countries with the highest HIV burdens.

In response to the HIV and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics, we build the capacity of our public- and private-sector partners to prevent TB and HIV and improve diagnosis and management of co-infected patients.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health partnered with the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP) to strengthen and coordinate its health information system. In 2009, when IHSSP was launched, the ministry had multiple systems to gather data from the country’s health services, but the systems used to aggregate and analyze the information were weak and were not interoperable.

The number of new TB cases has been declining steadily worldwide in recent years. However, the burden remains high among low-income and marginalized populations.

Half of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) go undetected and therefore untreated. TB is often considered a curse rather than a curable disease, and few consult health workers about it until they become incapacitated. Bringing information into the home is critical. Once a community understands TB, they tend to tell others who are coughing to go to the hospital.

More than 50 MSH staff from the home and country offices traveled to Cape Town, South Africa to participate in the 46th Union World Conference on Lung Health December 2-6, 2015. MSH, along with the USAID-funded, MSH-led Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, co-hosted four workshops, and presented 22 posters, 7 oral presentations and 7 symposiums.

This publication shares stories from the Strengthening TB and HIV & AIDS Responses in Eastern Uganda (STAR-E) project. STAR-E is a key partner with the government of Uganda in scaling up HIV and TB services. When the project began in 2009, STAR-E supported just 16 health facilities, with only one that provided antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Harmoniser les services de santé : Sauver des vies grâce à l’intégration des programmes de santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale et infantile avec ceux relatifs au VIH/SIDA, à la tuberculose et au paludisme (French title)

The USAID-funded African Strategies for Health (ASH) project undertook this childhood TB landscape analysis, to expand and centralize available information on childhood TB in Africa.

To better understand whether childhood TB guidelines can inform the roles and responsibilities of maternal and child health providers and to identify opportunities for strengthening them, USAID's Africa and Global Health Bureaus and the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project assessed existing childhood TB guidelines in 13 countries in Africa.

The African continent has seen pronounced movement toward regionalism in recent years. Regional bodies are actively contributing to the development of many sectors, including health.

An estimated 1 million children worldwide are infected with tuberculosis (TB) each year, representing about 11 percent of all TB cases.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). An estimated 60,000 new cases arise yearly, with 110,000 Afghans now living with TB; 14,000 Afghans died from the disease in 2015. Only about two in three presumed patients are found, and the treatment success rate is only 49 percent on average in the country.

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