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Modele de proposition et annexes Mecanisme de microfinancement

Annexe F Modele de calendrier

Annexe G Modele de budget

 Photo credit: Mark TuschmanVersion en français disponible à la suite de la version en anglais.REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:  Small Grants Mechanism to Support Civil Society Engagement, Alignment, and Coordinated Action for Improved Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health, Particularly in Relation to the Global Financing FacilityManagement Sciences for

Health service delivery data in Tanzania have tended to be disease- and health program-centric rather than client-centric. Patient information is stored in independent paper-based or electronic systems without a way to connect them or to locate one patient among multiple records.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Foire aux questions (FAQs)

The TRACK TB project’s goal was to increase the case detection rate (CDR) and the treatment success rate (TSR) in focus areas to meet national targets for reducing the burden of TB, MDR-TB, and TB/HIV.

Despite making good progress toward digitizing client level data, the Government of Tanzania is still working to meet the latest global guidelines for HIV/AIDS programs. One major reason is that the country’s data collection and HIS do not efficiently deliver the quality information required for effective monitoring and planning.

Urban health facilities present particular challenges in TB service provision.

This webinar, presented on March 19, 2019, explores how expanding the World Health Organization’s directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS) strategy to the densely populated city of Kabul has helped the country strengthen its TB control efforts. Implemented by USAID's Challenge TB Project in partnership with MSH and a broad coalition of organizations and health workers in pu

Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health and its consortium of partners, the goal of the five-year Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) program (2018–2023) is to help low- and middle- income countries strengthen their pharmaceutical systems to ensure sustainable access to and appropriate use of safe, effective, quality-assured, and affordable essentia

Attaining the goals of universal health coverage requires clear policies, robust legislation, and sound management practices supported by good governance. This premise is relevant to pharmaceutical systems, which are particularly vulnerable to corruption due to the economic value of medicines and the multiplicity of stakeholders.

Following USAID’s Journey to Self-Reliance framework and the agency’s health system and disease-specific strategies, MTaPS strengthens country human resources and institutions to: develop sustainable, high-impact country capacity for transparent, accountable pharmaceutical systems-related law, policy, planning, leadership, and management; improve countries’ capacity to collect, a

WHO’s Global Technical Strategy (GTS) for Malaria 2016–2030 aims to reduce global malaria incidence and deaths by at least 90% by 2030. To achieve these targets, high malaria burden countries need strong national pharmaceutical systems that can support the effective implementation of key malaria interventions.

USAID supports strategies to improve pharmaceutical-sector financing, including resource mobilization, allocation, and use.

Weaknesses in pharmaceutical regulatory systems contribute to limited access to quality-assured, safe, and efficacious life-saving essential medicines, including those for malaria; HIV/AIDS; and reproductive, maternal, and childhood diseases, and to the disruption of health service delivery, thereby preventing achievement of better health outcomes.

In recent years, significant donor and global TB community support has led to encouraging developments, giving low- and middle-income countries better diagnostic, prevention, and treatment tools to increase case detection and improve outcomes.

An AIDS-free world requires resilient and sustainable pharmaceutical systems that ensure universal access to the best available diagnostic, preventive, and treatment tools.

Pharmaceutical systems and the health system in general in many low- and middle-income countries suffer from poor data availability and accessibility. Typically, data are manually collected at service delivery points and then sent to the district, regional, or Ministry level for processing and storage with the hope that they will be captured electronically and analyzed.

Ensuring the uninterrupted availability of quality-assured medicines and health technologies from the manufacturer to end users is the ultimate goal of pharmaceutical supply chain systems. However, strategies to strengthen key supply chain components are inadequate in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and systems cannot effectively manage local and global health program demands.

USAID MTaPS supports the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), whose purpose is to help build countries’ capacity to protect themselves from infectious disease threats and to raise global health security as a national and worldwide priority. The GHSA has 11 action packages, including one to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

USAID MTaPS applies systems-based approaches using proven tools, interventions, and quality improvement methodologies to strengthen in-country capacity and enhance patient-centered pharmaceutical care. In doing so, MTaPS embeds the culture of quality of care emphasized by the Sustainable Development Goals, the World Health Organization, and other global and national bodies.

The year 2015 saw a critical transition in global development. The Millennium Development Goals, which mobilized national governments to achieve remarkable improvements in health and reductions in poverty, were succeeded by the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 17 SDGs demand even more universal and ambitious action to eliminate poverty.

Mobile applications play an important role in field data collection in developing countries. However, poor infrastructure remains a challenge to fully utilizing mobile services. e-TB Manager, an electronic tuberculosis (TB) management system, is a web-based tool used to manage all TB-related data and information needed by national TB control programs.

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