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Annex D Biographical Data Form (AID Form 1420)

Annex E MSH Pre-Award Survey

Annex E.a. DUNS Instructions

Clean water, nutritious food, and a hygienic environment— these are the building blocks of health for any community. Yet, these necessities are out of reach for many families in low-resource environments. As a result, malnutrition contributes to 45 percent of childhood deaths worldwide.

Procurement Notice

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is seeking proposals for technical assistance (TA). This TA is intended to support planned activities under the Sector-Wide Program Management and Monitoring (SWPMM) Operational Plan (OP) under the Health Services Division (HSD), Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MOHFW).

USAID MTaPS supports the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), whose purpose is to help build countries’ capacity to protect themselves from infectious disease threats and to raise global health security as a national and worldwide priority. The GHSA has 11 action packages, including one to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health and its consortium of partners, the goal of the five-year Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) program (2018–2023) is to help low- and middle- income countries strengthen their pharmaceutical systems to ensure sustainable access to and appropriate use of safe, effective, quality-assured, and affordable essentia

Attaining the goals of universal health coverage requires clear policies, robust legislation, and sound management practices supported by good governance. This premise is relevant to pharmaceutical systems, which are particularly vulnerable to corruption due to the economic value of medicines and the multiplicity of stakeholders.

WHO’s Global Technical Strategy (GTS) for Malaria 2016–2030 aims to reduce global malaria incidence and deaths by at least 90% by 2030. To achieve these targets, high malaria burden countries need strong national pharmaceutical systems that can support the effective implementation of key malaria interventions.

In recent years, significant donor and global TB community support has led to encouraging developments, giving low- and middle-income countries better diagnostic, prevention, and treatment tools to increase case detection and improve outcomes.

TB infection prevention and control (IPC) is an important strategy to prevent disease transmission—it is a combination of measures to minimize the risk of transmission from a TB case to other patients, health care providers, and the wider population.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s high MDR-TB burden countries. According to the WHO, the MDR-TB burden is 1.6% among new cases and 29% among retreatment cases. The longer duration of MDR-TB treatment regimens and the toxicity of certain agents discourage many patients from completing treatment.

In collaboration with the National TB Control Program (NTP) in Bangladesh, the USAID-funded Challenge TB established a high-quality Bio-Safety Level-3 Laboratory (BSL-3 lab) in Sylhet to accelerate TB and DR-TB diagnosis and treatment in the northeast region of the country. The BSL-3 lab, the highest level of safety of its type in Bangladesh, provides rapid and quality services.

Using antiretrovirals (ARVs) as tracer products, we identified the following key practices that may affect supply chain management at the facility level: order verification, actions taken when stock is received, changes in prescription and dispensing due to ARV stock-out, actions to ensure patient adherence, and communication with other affiliated facilities and higher-level supply chain management. We propose a set of indicators to measure these practices.

Ensuring the uninterrupted availability of quality-assured medicines and health technologies from the manufacturer to end users is the ultimate goal of pharmaceutical supply chain systems. However, strategies to strengthen key supply chain components are inadequate in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and systems cannot effectively manage local and global health program demands.

Pharmaceutical systems and the health system in general in many low- and middle-income countries suffer from poor data availability and accessibility. Typically, data are manually collected at service delivery points and then sent to the district, regional, or Ministry level for processing and storage with the hope that they will be captured electronically and analyzed.

An AIDS-free world requires resilient and sustainable pharmaceutical systems that ensure universal access to the best available diagnostic, preventive, and treatment tools.

Weaknesses in pharmaceutical regulatory systems contribute to limited access to quality-assured, safe, and efficacious life-saving essential medicines, including those for malaria; HIV/AIDS; and reproductive, maternal, and childhood diseases, and to the disruption of health service delivery, thereby preventing achievement of better health outcomes.

Following USAID’s Journey to Self-Reliance framework and the agency’s health system and disease-specific strategies, MTaPS strengthens country human resources and institutions to: develop sustainable, high-impact country capacity for transparent, accountable pharmaceutical systems-related law, policy, planning, leadership, and management; improve countries’ capacity to collect, a

USAID MTaPS applies systems-based approaches using proven tools, interventions, and quality improvement methodologies to strengthen in-country capacity and enhance patient-centered pharmaceutical care. In doing so, MTaPS embeds the culture of quality of care emphasized by the Sustainable Development Goals, the World Health Organization, and other global and national bodies.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world’s most pressing and urgent global health threats —one that could erode gains against tuberculosis (TB), malaria, HIV/AIDS, and many other infectious diseases. While AMR has emerged as a critical issue at the global level, current efforts to address AMR are insufficient to curb its spread.

Year Ended June 30, 2018, drawn from audited financial statements.

Since 1971, MSH has worked in more than 150 countries to strengthen health systems and help our partners consistently deliver effective, affordable, and available medicines and services. We lead by supporting and educating, helping people build on what they already know to ultimately take charge of their own development—and their own health.

The USAID-funded Challenge TB project collaborated with the Ethiopian National TB Control Program (NTP) and regional health bureaus to integrate TB screening into all health service outlets across the country. The intensive support included mentorship of hospital staff by zonal and regional teams, routine check-ins, on-site capacity building, and close follow-up.

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