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Outbreaks can overwhelm weak or fragile health systems that lack the tools, infrastructure, policies, and systems to keep communities healthy and safe. Timely detection, preparedness, and appropriate response are essential for limiting both the loss of human life and crippling political and socio-economic impact of disease outbreaks.

A civil society organisation (CSO) perspective on how UHC can be reached by 2030 Universal Health Coverage 2030 (UHC2030) MSH is the secretariat for the Civil Society Engagement Mechanism of UHC2030, a global movement to build stronger health systems for universal health coverage.

This study compared the yield of TB among contacts of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) index cases with that of drug-sensitive TB (DS-TB) index cases in a program setting. The yield of TB among contacts of MDR-TB and DS-TB using GeneXpert was high as compared to population-level prevalence. The likelihood of diagnosing RR (Rifampicin Resistant)-TB among contacts of MDR-TB index cases is higher in comparison with contacts of DS-TB index cases. The use of GeneXpert in DS TB contact investigation has an added advantage of diagnosing RR cases in contrast to using the nationally recommended AFB microscopy for DS TB contact investigation.

Despite the commitment of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to expand the family planning method mix and increase access to services, awareness of emergency contraception is low among women, and the method remains underused and poorly integrated in family planning programming. Data from 15 focus group discussions conducted in 2016 among women aged 15–35 were used to examine awareness and perceptions of, and attitudes toward, emergency contraceptives. Emergency contraceptive pills have the potential to address gaps in the family planning method mix in the DRC. Assessing whether women have incomplete or erroneous information about family planning methods can provide better understanding of women's contraceptive choices in low-income countries.

Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are commonly under-reported in low- and-medium-income countries. This study aimed to estimate the number of RTIs and determine the magnitude of under-reporting by traffic police and hospital registries. The police registry captured 14.4% of the estimated number of RTIs and the hospitals captured 60.4%. The estimated number of RTIs was higher than reported by either the police or the hospitals alone. Neither the police nor the hospitals provided accurate data on RTIs, calling for the strengthening of both sources of data.

Building coalitions can amplify stakeholder efforts to carry out effective AMR prevention and control strategies. We have developed and implemented an approach to help local stakeholders kick-start the coalition-building process. The five-step process is to (1) mobilise support, (2) understand the local situation, (3) develop an action plan, (4) implement the plan, and (5) monitor and evaluate. Our experience with the coalition-building approach in Ethiopia, Namibia, Zambia, and with the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network shows that coalitions can form in a variety of ways with many different stakeholders, including government, academia, and faith-based organisations, to organise actions to preserve the effectiveness of existing antimicrobials and contain AMR.

We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 33,744 mother–infant pairs to estimate the use and outcomes of the Malawian programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most women used the Malawian programme for the prevention of MTCT. The risk of MTCT increased if any of the four main steps in the programme were missed.

Challenge TB (CTB) is a global USAID-funded project, working in Afghanistan. CTB/Afghanistan is a five year project effective from January 2015-September 2019. Globally, it is implemented in partnership with MSH, KNCV, WHO, Ministry of Public Health (MoPH)/National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), WHO, JICA, Global Fund and locally, by BPHS implementers.

Technical Highlight Malaria is responsible for about 7% of all deaths in children under five in Madagascar. The USAID Mikolo Project promoted community approaches to prevent and treat malaria by working with health facilities, community health volunteers (CHVs), and families.

The objective of this study was to describe the conceptual and implementation approach of selected digital health technologies that were tailored in various resource-constrained countries. Drawing from our multi-year institutional experience in more than 20 high disease-burden countries that aspire to meet the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, we screened internal project documentation on various digital health tools that provide clarity in the conceptual and implementation approach. Taking into account geographic diversity, we provide a descriptive review of five selected case studies from Bangladesh (Asia), Mali (Francophone Africa), Uganda (East Africa), Mozambique (Lusophone Africa), and Namibia (Southern Africa). A key lesson learned is to harness and build on existing governance structures. The use of data for decision-making at all levels needs to be cultivated and sustained through multi-stakeholder partnerships. The next phase of information management development is to build systems for triangulation of data from patients, commodities, geomapping, and other parameters of the pharmaceutical system. A well-defined research agenda must be developed to determine the effectiveness of the country- and regional-level dashboards as an early warning system to mitigate stock-outs and wastage of medicines and commodities.

In April 2016, the Population Council, in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, convened a regional meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, geared toward supporting countries in East and Southern Africa in meeting their obligations under the Maputo Protocol. Government and civil society representatives from six countries participated: Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, and Zambia. The meeting was the first activity in a joint project of technical assistance by the conveners, aimed at strengthening access to comprehensive post-rape care for survivors of sexual violence. The regional technical meeting concluded with a discussion of practical steps that participants could take to facilitate legal, policy, and program reform with respect to pregnancy prevention and safe abortion in their respective countries.

In this edition, you will read about MSH support to Society for Women and Children Living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (SOWCHAN) advocacy march to the National Assembly on World Aids Day; how we are applying gender lens in Nigeria; and mitigating human resource gaps in general hospital Minna.

In this edition, you will read about MSH’s work in ensuring that Or- phans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) return to school in Nigeria, HIV Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) laboratory transitioned to the Global Fund and FHI360.

We build strong health systems—systems that offer every individual access to high-quality, affordable health services. Systems that can stop an epidemic in its tracks. Systems that can withstand the shocks of an economic meltdown or a conflict.

Year Ended June 30, 2017, drawn from audited financial statements.

The purpose of this assignment is to support the MoH and provide international expertise to develop a strategy on improving regulations on the bioequivalence of generic medicines in line with European Union (EU) practices.

Building Success is a series of guides offering practical, concrete, and innovative approaches that have proven effective in strengthening the response to HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis in Nigeria. Each of the four guides can stand alone, but they will be most effective if used as components of an integrated package.

Community health volunteers (CHVs) in Madagascar serve as first-line health care providers for many communities located more than five kilometers from a basic health center (CSB). They provide routine services for family planning and maternal, newborn, and child health, and refer patients for appropriate higher-level services.

Infectious disease outbreaks devastate communities and cost the world $60 billion a year in response efforts—matching the toll of wars and natural disasters in terms of economic impact and lives lost. Local preparedness is the key to stopping outbreaks at the source.

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem in the regions of East, Central, and Southern Africa (ECSA). Because TB is an airborne disease, its transmission is facilitated by the movement of people across internal and national borders.

The overall objective of this baseline study is to help gather or generate information as a point of reference on the health condition of the population living in the project supported health zones, the management and supervision capacity of health services decentralized entities,  the situation and barriers for access to health services, the quality of health services, and health knowledge,

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