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The LMG for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course was first developed with LMG Project partner Amref Health Africa in 2014.

This report details the results of the USAID-funded Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG) Project's evaluation of the LMG for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course in June and July 2016.The LMG for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course was first developed with LMG Project partner Amref Health Africa in 2014.

The LMG for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course was first developed with LMG Project partner Amref Health Africa in 2014.

Prior to 2002, the vast majority of health service delivery systems in Afghanistan were non-existent or informal.

At the end of 2011, Côte d’Ivoire faced significant health challenges, particularly in the area of maternal and child health, and was struggling to prevent and treat HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, but the Government of Côte d’Ivoire articulated a vision for an integrated, accountable, efficient health care system that would guarantee the health and well-being of all citize

For six years, the Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG) Project strengthened health systems to deliver more responsive services to more people by developing inspired leaders, establishing sound management systems, and promoting effective governance practices to unlock the potential of individuals, networks, organizations, and governments.This report summarizes the Project’s activitie

This report summarizes significant USAID MTaPS achievements, key challenges, program performance, and adaptation in response to new demands and lessons learned for the July through September 2019 period. The report is organized by health area, objective, region, and country.

Over the last decade, the Ethiopian health system has undergone rapid changes resulting in notable improvements in health. However, Ethiopia remains a high tuberculosis (TB)-burden country with an estimated incidence of 164 per 100,000 population. TB services are decentralized to deliver care to rural communities however there are fragmentations in the level of services provided.

This report summarizes significant USAID MTaPS achievements, key challenges, program performance, and adaptation in response to new demands and lessons learned for the October through December 2019 period. The report is organized by health area, objective, region, and country.

Please download to read the USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity in Ukraine News Digest, January 2020 edition.

Despite significant progress towards achieving its Millennium Development Goals, Madagascar was unable to meet many of its targets. The Government of Madagascar has identified community health as a priority for improving health outcomes and is therefore updating its National Community Health Policy and Strategy.

The National Community Health Strategy (SNSC) 2019-2023 for Burkina Faso, validated on December 28, 2018, seeks to set up a national health system which promotes preventative health and makes the community approach to primary health care the foundation for achieving universal health coverage.

The USAID-funded Integrated Health Services Activity (IHSA) supported the Ministry of Health of Benin and the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) to launch an important seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) campaign, where antimalarial medications are given monthly to treat and prevent the disease.

The Ouoré health center is an isolated facility in the commune of Kérou, department of Atacora, in Benin. Based on the volume of services provided by the health center, Ouoré received funding to build a new maternity ward from the Fond d’Appui au Développement des Communes (FaDeC) in 2017.

Building capacity for resource mobilization is at the center of the Government of Benin’s (GOB) decentralization strategy for improving the health and well-being of the people of Benin. The Fonds d’appui au développement des communes (FADeC) is a tool created by the GOB to support this strategy and attests to the government’s strong commitment.

In Benin, gender-based violence (GBV) survivors can access an integrated package of services, including medical and psychosocial care, by visiting one of the country’s One Stop GBV centers, located in the cities of Cotonou, Parakou, and Abomey. However, GBV survivors who live in other regions might be unable to access these services due to financial and other barriers.

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Accessible Continuum of Care and Essential Services Sustained (ACCESS) program is a five-year (2018-2023) integrated health project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health.The goal of the program is to accelerate sustainable health impacts for the Malagasy population through three primary objectives:• Quality healt

The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of renal function and liver enzyme abnormalities among HIV‐infected children, changes in prevalence with time on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and the factors associated with these abnormalities. A high prevalence of liver enzyme and renal function abnormalities was observed at enrolment. Decreasing liver enzyme levels during follow‐up are possibly reassuring, while the progressive reduction in GFR and the increase in BUN are worrisome and require further study.

Factors in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) that lead to excess mortality and poor maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) include poor nutrition, lack of adequate services for antenatal (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC), poor immunization coverage for women and children, elevated rated of malaria and low treatment rates, inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene, and increased rates of gender based violence. This study analyzed the impact of a modified Champion Community Approach (CCA) implemented in DRC on MNCH indicators. Between 2012 and 2017, 73 Champion Communities were developed. Among health areas with Champion Communities compared with health areas with no champion community, there were statistically significant increases in health area indicator rates in antenatal care (48%), early and exclusive breastfeeding (77%), family planning (55%), assisted birth (50%) and decreased moderate malnutrition rates (44%). The modified CCA implemented in DRC was an innovative community mobilization approach that fostered and institutionalized community leadership. Income generation and NGO status were unique and transformative steps that led to independence, autonomy and sustainability of the approach and were associated with improved MNCH indicators through behavior change.

Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in the use of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) to support health technology assessment (HTA) agencies for setting healthcare priorities. However, its implementation to date has been criticized for being “entirely mechanistic,” ignoring opportunity costs, and not following best practice guidelines. This article provides guidance on the use of MCDA in this context. The present study was based on a systematic review and consensus development. We developed a typology of MCDA studies and good implementation practice. We reviewed 36 studies over the period 1990 to 2018 on their compliance with good practice and developed recommendations. We identified 3 MCDA study types: qualitative MCDA, quantitative MCDA, and MCDA with decision rules. The types perform differently in terms of quality, consistency, and transparency of recommendations on healthcare priorities. We advise HTA agencies to always include a deliberative component. Agencies should, at a minimum, undertake qualitative MCDA. 

Tanzania has made great progress in reducing diarrhea mortality in under-five children. We examined factors associated with the decline and projected the impact of scaling up interventions or reducing risk factors on diarrhea deaths. Diarrhea-specific mortality among under-five children in Tanzania declined by 89% from 35.3 deaths per 1000 live births in 1980 to 3.9 deaths per 1000 live births in 2015. Factors associated with diarrhea-specific under-five mortality reduction included oral rehydration solution (ORS) use, changes in stunting prevalence, vitamin A supplementation, rotavirus vaccine, change in wasting prevalence and change in age-appropriate breastfeeding practices. Universal coverage of direct diarrhea, nutrition and WASH interventions has the potential reduce the diarrhea-specific mortality rate by 90%.

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