: Our Impact

Could people become immune?A paper by Dr. Malcolm Bryant of Management Sciences for Health was presented at the American Public Health Association Conference in San Francisco last November. The topic of this provocative presentation was whether widespread resistance to antiretroviral agents is inevitable in Africa.Antiretroviral treatments provide hope to people infected with HIV/AIDS in Africa and around the world. However, this treatment requires an absolutely accurate prescription coupled with an adherence by the patient to a prescribed regimen.

During 2002 alone, 3.1 million people died of AIDS and another 5 million were newly infected. Young people ages 15-24 account for 42 percent of new HIV infections and represent almost one-third of people living with HIV/AIDS worldwide.

South Africa is home to the largest number of HIV-positive people in the world. Approximately 3.5 million new HIV infections occurred in sub-Saharan Africa in 2002, with youth and women most infected. To protect their community’s younger generation from the scourge of AIDS and help prevent new infections, some village leaders in South Africa’s impoverished Eastern Cape Province are promoting abstinence.With support from the U.S.

South Africa is home to the largest number of HIV-positive people in the world. Approximately 3.5 million new HIV infections occurred in sub-Saharan Africa in 2002, with youth and women most infected. To protect their community’s younger generation from the scourge of AIDS and help prevent new infections, some village leaders in South Africa’s impoverished Eastern Cape Province are promoting abstinence.With support from the U.S.

Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. In South Africa, women are more likely to die of tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, or other infectious disease than are men. Between 2000 and 2005, the United Nations estimates that half of the deaths of children below the age of five will be due to AIDS.Across South Africa, those involved in health care are struggling to improve health services for women and children and prevent these needless deaths.

Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. In South Africa, women are more likely to die of tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, or other infectious disease than are men. Between 2000 and 2005, the United Nations estimates that half of the deaths of children below the age of five will be due to AIDS.Across South Africa, those involved in health care are struggling to improve health services for women and children and prevent these needless deaths.

Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. In South Africa, women are more likely to die of tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, or other infectious disease than are men. Between 2000 and 2005, the United Nations estimates that half of the deaths of children below the age of five will be due to AIDS.Across South Africa, those involved in health care are struggling to improve health services for women and children and prevent these needless deaths.

The Disease with No NameOn October 25, 2002, 26-year old Zanele Mavana is slowly dying in her home in a rural village of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Her three children, ages 10, 8, and 4, watch as their mother's bones become more visible. She no longer has the strength to get out of bed; her diarrhea has stained the sheets as she waits helplessly for someone to clean her. To reach the nearest hospital, she would have to walk for hours, first through the open, hilly field surrounding her home, followed by mud roads, then gravel roads, and finally a tarred road.

Today, as the sun rises over the rural villages of South Africa's Eastern Cape Province, community members witness what is becoming a common sight. A motorbike speeds by and its driver readily waves; today he does not stop to chat. He is Mtiteto Mfikile and he has work to do. Meanwhile, a village nurse hears the beep of her cell phone and she too gets to work - an SMS message from a nearby laboratory gives her TB smear results of a patient. She can start appropriate treatment now.

Today, as the sun rises over the rural villages of South Africa's Eastern Cape Province, community members witness what is becoming a common sight. A motorbike speeds by and its driver readily waves; today he does not stop to chat. He is Mtiteto Mfikile and he has work to do. Meanwhile, a village nurse hears the beep of her cell phone and she too gets to work - an SMS message from a nearby laboratory gives her TB smear results of a patient. She can start appropriate treatment now.

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