: Our Impact

March 24 is World Tuberculosis Day. Despite significant effort by the global health community to detect and treat tuberculosis (TB), the number of cases is still rising. To control TB and save lives, it is vital to improve detection and treatment in a comprehensive and sustainable way and to strengthen the systems that support detection and treatment. In more than 30 countries, MSH is building partnerships across sectors—internationally, nationally, and locally—to integrate TB services with HIV services and primary health care.

March 24 is World Tuberculosis Day. Despite significant effort by the global health community to detect and treat tuberculosis (TB), the number of cases is still rising. To control TB and save lives, it is vital to improve detection and treatment in a comprehensive and sustainable way and to strengthen the systems that support detection and treatment. In more than 30 countries, MSH is building partnerships across sectors—internationally, nationally, and locally—to integrate TB services with HIV services and primary health care.

March 24 is World Tuberculosis Day. Despite significant effort by the global health community to detect and treat tuberculosis (TB), the number of cases is still rising. To control TB and save lives, it is vital to improve detection and treatment in a comprehensive and sustainable way and to strengthen the systems that support detection and treatment. In more than 30 countries, MSH is building partnerships across sectors—internationally, nationally, and locally—to integrate TB services with HIV services and primary health care.

In 2006, the Malawi Ministry of Health chose the artemisinin-based combination therapy artemether-lumefantrine as the first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. However, when Malawi officially launched the policy nationwide, one of the greatest challenges was a lack of capacity among health workers and pharmacy personnel to manage the new treatment.

In 2006, the Malawi Ministry of Health chose the artemisinin-based combination therapy artemether-lumefantrine as the first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. However, when Malawi officially launched the policy nationwide, one of the greatest challenges was a lack of capacity among health workers and pharmacy personnel to manage the new treatment.

MSH recently started a five-year project for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Nigeria through the Community-based Support for OVC in Nigeria (CUBS) project. Funded by the President’s Fund for Emergency Relief through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the project plans to reach 50,000 OVC and 12,500 caregivers in 11 Nigerian states through a variety of community-based and family-centered service delivery approaches that will support the implementation of Nigeria’s National Plan of Action on OVC. According to CUBS Chief of Party, Dr.

MSH recently started a five-year project for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Nigeria through the Community-based Support for OVC in Nigeria (CUBS) project. Funded by the President’s Fund for Emergency Relief through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the project plans to reach 50,000 OVC and 12,500 caregivers in 11 Nigerian states through a variety of community-based and family-centered service delivery approaches that will support the implementation of Nigeria’s National Plan of Action on OVC. According to CUBS Chief of Party, Dr.

MSH recently started a five-year project for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Nigeria through the Community-based Support for OVC in Nigeria (CUBS) project. Funded by the President’s Fund for Emergency Relief through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the project plans to reach 50,000 OVC and 12,500 caregivers in 11 Nigerian states through a variety of community-based and family-centered service delivery approaches that will support the implementation of Nigeria’s National Plan of Action on OVC. According to CUBS Chief of Party, Dr.

MSH recently started a five-year project for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Nigeria through the Community-based Support for OVC in Nigeria (CUBS) project. Funded by the President’s Fund for Emergency Relief through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the project plans to reach 50,000 OVC and 12,500 caregivers in 11 Nigerian states through a variety of community-based and family-centered service delivery approaches that will support the implementation of Nigeria’s National Plan of Action on OVC. According to CUBS Chief of Party, Dr.

Ernancy Bien-Aimé, with her arm in a cast, continues to advocate for health services in Haiti. Photo Credit: MSH StaffIn October 2009, Ernancy Bien-Aimé was eager to address health challenges within her community of Cité Soleil, Haiti.  She had just finished a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program (LDP) targeted to youth.

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