: Our Impact

{Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal}Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal

Monitoring patients who are taking a new medicine is critical for patient safety and an essential component of a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. The USAID MTaPS Program is working in Mozambique to establish an active surveillance system to assess the safety of an HIV drug in HIV/TB co-infected patients, including pregnant women, that has recently been introduced in the country. The concern for pregnant women stems from earlier indications of neural tube defect in babies born to women taking the medicine and the fact that women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Mozambique.

{Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal}Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal

Monitoring patients who are taking a new medicine is critical for patient safety and an essential component of a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. The USAID MTaPS Program is working in Mozambique to establish an active surveillance system to assess the safety of an HIV drug in HIV/TB co-infected patients, including pregnant women, that has recently been introduced in the country. The concern for pregnant women stems from earlier indications of neural tube defect in babies born to women taking the medicine and the fact that women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Mozambique.

{Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal}Photo Credit Fabrice Duhal

Monitoring patients who are taking a new medicine is critical for patient safety and an essential component of a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. The USAID MTaPS Program is working in Mozambique to establish an active surveillance system to assess the safety of an HIV drug in HIV/TB co-infected patients, including pregnant women, that has recently been introduced in the country. The concern for pregnant women stems from earlier indications of neural tube defect in babies born to women taking the medicine and the fact that women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Mozambique.

What If An Early Warning of the Next Pandemic Was Not in the Jungle, But in Your Living Room? The Hill: Can Veterinarians Save Us from the Next Pandemic?Ashley Arabasadi, MSH Senior External Affairs Officer, May 29, 2020Three-quarters of all emerging diseases are zoonotic, and a pandemic threat anywhere is a threat everywhere. In an opinion article for The Hill, MSH’s Senior External Affairs Officer, Ashley Arabasadi, and Dr.

What If An Early Warning of the Next Pandemic Was Not in the Jungle, But in Your Living Room? The Hill: Can Veterinarians Save Us from the Next Pandemic?Ashley Arabasadi, MSH Senior External Affairs Officer, May 29, 2020Three-quarters of all emerging diseases are zoonotic, and a pandemic threat anywhere is a threat everywhere. In an opinion article for The Hill, MSH’s Senior External Affairs Officer, Ashley Arabasadi, and Dr.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

In the wake of the US decision to terminate the relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO), Pandemic Action Network and leading global health organizations have published a brief paper outlining some of the critical steps that the world needs to take to prevent pandemics. The report sets out a key challenge for global leaders to work together in an unprecedented way to end COVID-19 as swiftly as possible and prepare for future pandemic threats.The report, published jointly by the Pandemic Action Network, ONE, PATH, Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), Global Health Security Agenda

Family home outside of Pucallpa, Peru. Photo Credit: Leslie Alsheimer

Three-quarters of all emerging diseases are zoonotic, and yet most countries do not have a comprehensive animal health surveillance network. In an opinion article for The Hill, “Can Veterinarians Save Us from the Next Pandemic?,” MSH’s Senior External Affairs Officer, Ashley Arabasadi, and Dr. Tracey McNamara, a veterinary pathologist who played the catalyst’s role in identifying West Nile Virus, discuss the need to invest in animal disease surveillance to prevent the next pandemic.Read their commentary in The Hill, here.

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A mother and her child sit under their bednet in Vohipeno, Madagascar.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

While progress against malaria in the last 20 years has been significant, many people continue to suffer and die from this preventable and treatable disease. Malaria is among the leading causes of child mortality in Africa. In 2018, nearly 900,000 children in 38 African countries were born with a low birth weight due to malaria in pregnancy, and children under five still accounted for two-thirds of all malaria deaths worldwide.

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A mother and her child sit under their bednet in Vohipeno, Madagascar.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

While progress against malaria in the last 20 years has been significant, many people continue to suffer and die from this preventable and treatable disease. Malaria is among the leading causes of child mortality in Africa. In 2018, nearly 900,000 children in 38 African countries were born with a low birth weight due to malaria in pregnancy, and children under five still accounted for two-thirds of all malaria deaths worldwide.

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A mother and her child sit under their bednet in Vohipeno, Madagascar.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

While progress against malaria in the last 20 years has been significant, many people continue to suffer and die from this preventable and treatable disease. Malaria is among the leading causes of child mortality in Africa. In 2018, nearly 900,000 children in 38 African countries were born with a low birth weight due to malaria in pregnancy, and children under five still accounted for two-thirds of all malaria deaths worldwide.

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