Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

Women wait to receive services outside a health center in Tanzania. Photo Credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH

In January 2020, the Tanzania Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC), in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Technical Support Services Project (TSSP), identified the need for a national health cross-cutting dashboard that would allow for more efficient reporting from the District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS-2), which is the national health information data repository. We spoke with Isaelly Nagunwa, Strategic Information Advisor, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) TSSP, and Claud John Kumalija, MoHCDGEC Head

A Jinja Regional Referral Hospital staff member receives redistributed TB medicines from Lira Regional Referral Hospital.Photo credit: Benjamin Atwine/MSH

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a critical public health problem in Uganda, where the prevalence of MDR-TB in 2015 was an estimated 1.6% among newly diagnosed TB cases and 12% among previously treated TB cases. Uninterrupted access to treatment is necessary to prevent a more serious form of MDR-TB, ensure that the treatment works, and help prevent drug resistance. However, the months-long treatment, plus side effects such as nausea and vomiting, causes some patients to abandon the regimen.

 The USAID SAFEMed Activity in Ukraine launched an innovative public private partnership to improve the distribution of antiretrovirals for HIV and TB medications.

The rates of HIV and TB in Ukraine are high, yet some regions lack access to enough medicines for these and other conditions. The country has the second-largest HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Tuberculosis, which is the leading cause of death among infectious diseases in Ukraine, is especially dangerous due to the high estimated number of patients with multidrug-resistant TB.

 {Photo credit: Dr. Stanley Ugah}Mrs. Folake Ajayi takes her IPTp while being observed by health care workers during ANC at PHC Oniyanrin.Photo credit: Dr. Stanley Ugah

Malaria is common among pregnant women in Oyo State, Nigeria, which increases the risk of maternal anemia, low birth weight, premature delivery, stillbirth, and death of infants. Although intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) helps prevent these adverse effects for pregnant women and their unborn children, its uptake in the state is poor. Indeed, IPTp uptake across health facilities in Oyo State was less than 50% from April 2019 to February 2020, when the U.S President’s Malaria Initiative for States (PMI-S) project started supporting the state.

Do you have a bold idea on how to help the people of Uganda have more access to affordable, quality, essential, medicines and health supplies? If so, submit your idea(s) to Uganda’s first-ever Health Supply Chain Solutions Challenge, hosted by the newly launched Supply Chain Innovation Lab. Winners will work with our team of experts in Uganda’s supply chain innovation community to turn your idea into action. 

A health care worker counsels pregnant women on the importance of preventing malaria during pregnancy in Ishelu, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Photo credit: Oluwatobiloba Akerele/MSH

Read this story on USAID's websiteAn estimated 76 percent of Nigeria’s population are at risk of malaria by living in high transmission areas.  Nigeria accounts for 27 percent of malaria cases worldwide and the highest number of deaths (24 percent) due to malaria in 2019 (World Malaria Report, 2020).  The U.S. President's Malaria Initiative for States (PMI-S) activity managed by USAID recognizes that “it takes a village” to achieve a malaria-free Nigeria.

MSH was formed in May 1971 by Dr. Ron O’Connor to focus on supporting countries as they strengthen their health systems and the local ownership needed to achieve sustainable change. In 2021, we are celebrating our five decades of health impact. But we are not going to celebrate this anniversary by reflecting on the past. We want to focus on the future of global health – the Next 50 Years.We turn 50 during a time when, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of global health is on everyone’s mind and impacting everyone’s lives.

 {Photo credit: MSH Staff}Bravo Otohabru, Supply Chain Director of the Resilient and Sustainable Systems for Health (RSSH) project, presents final supply chain policy documents.Photo credit: MSH Staff

“This is a new dawn for health sector supply chain in the country, as these documents will further promote access to quality medicines and enhance universal health coverage.” — Hon. Dr. Osagie Emmanuel Ehanire, Minister of Health, Federal Ministry of Health, NigeriaOn March 4, 2021, at an event attended by government officials at federal and state levels, donor agencies, technical partners, and implementers in the health sector, the Hon. Dr.

On September 24, 2020 over 120 health care professionals in Ukraine gathered online for the 2nd National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Forum led by the Ministry of Health of Ukraine, with support from the MSH-led, USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity.  HTA, an evidence-based instrument to identify which medicines, medical devices, and treatment regimens are optimal for a state to support, is designed to serve as a key priority-setting tool for Ukraine’s health system. Globally, HTA is recognized as the preferred tool for reviewing health technologies and providing evidence for the value they can deliver to patients, the health system, and more broadly, to society.

 {Photo credit: Sheila Mwebaze/MSH}Community health worker Betty Achilla examines a baby at one of the 31 households she supports.Photo credit: Sheila Mwebaze/MSH

Eight years ago, Betty Achilla was selected by her community to be a volunteer community health worker. She is currently serving 31 households in the Abim district in Northeastern Uganda. Betty is one of more than 60,000 volunteer community health workers in Uganda who play a vital role in extending maternal and child health services to hard-to-reach communities.As a community health worker, Betty was trained in the basics of diagnosing and dispensing medicines to treat common childhood illnesses such as malaria, diarrhea, and pneumonia and to identify danger signs in children and refer them to nearby health centers. To do her work, Betty must have an adequate and consistent supply of malaria rapid diagnostic tests, antimalarial medicines, oral rehydration solution, zinc, and antibiotics.

Pages