Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH}A patient receives treatment in a new chemotherapy seat.Photo credit: MSH

The Kenyatta National Hospital Cancer Treatment Center (CTC) is the only health facility in Kenya where the poor can obtain advanced comprehensive treatment for cancer. But given the high demand for services, these patients often experience delays of up to five weeks to see a doctor, resulting in complications and, in some cases, death. This situation is exacerbated by insufficient medical personnel as well as inadequate and in some cases dilapidated equipment.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

 {Photo credit: MSH}Gertrude Kinyua shares her vision at the LDP results workshop in Nairobi in September.Photo credit: MSH

"I had always wanted to start a community gender based violence outreach program as a link between Kenyatta National Hospital and the community," says Ms. Gertrude Kinyua, a Senior Nursing Officer/Sexual Forensic Nurse at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). That was Gertrude’s unrealized dream for a long time, until she participated in a Leadership Development Program (LDP) offered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership Management and Sustainability (LMS) Project in Kenya.

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. (MSH) will be soliciting expressions of interest (EOIs) in October 2013 from qualified organizations with capabilities and experience in one or more of four technical areas: Governance and Oversight; Program & Financial Management; Procurement & Supply Management; and Monitoring & Evaluation. The regions of interest for this solicitation may include: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), East Africa, West and Central Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Read the full pre-announcement

 {Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare}Nigerian woman.Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare

Management Sciences for Health’s Nigeria Program to build Leadership and Accountability in Nigeria's Health System (PLAN-Health) supported the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) Health and Human Services Secretariat of the Health Planning, Research and Statistics department to develop an eHealth policy. The eHealth policy is a set of principles and actions to guide implementation of healthcare practices supported by electronic processes and communication, including the use of health applications on mobile phones.

 {Photo credit: MSH} Teens and girls from the community of Shambillo, in Padre Abad District, participate in a workshop on leadership, goal setting, and self esteem.Photo credit: MSH

In the rural Padre Abad district of Peru’s Ucayali region, located in the Amazon Rainforest, teenage girls are nearly twice as likely to have an early pregnancy between ages 15 and 19 than their peers across the country.  

 {Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.}APYIN staff.Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.

The Association for Positive Youth Living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (APYIN) promotes sexual and reproductive health rights of young people in eight Nigerian states. However, the project was experiencing some challenges with streamlining activities, recordkeeping, and assuring the quality of services. As a result, APYIN was underperforming and at risk of losing donor funding.

 {Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman}Dr. Tali Butkap addresses community members during a sensitization meeting in Waru.Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman

Waru is an underserved and hard-to-reach indigenous community in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. Until recently, this community did not have a safe waste disposal system and the majority of homes did not have toilets. Residents often dumped their garbage in open fields and defecated in bushes. This haphazard disposal of human waste and garbage caused Waru’s water sources and environment to become contaminated and, in turn, many residents suffered from diarrhea, cholera, intestinal worms, malaria, and typhoid.

Ummuro Adano

Donors, national governments, civil society, and international partners are grappling with three realities in the domain of HIV and AIDS today: (1) the need to accelerate country ownership and leadership of HIV and AIDS programming; (2) diminishing donor resources; and (3) the need to strengthen local implementing organizations and institutions to sustain the AIDS response in terms of: access to prevention, treatment, care, and support services; addressing stigma, discrimination and human rights abuses that key populations continue to face in many parts of the world; and supporting orphan

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