Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria}A Minna hospital employee checks a blood sample for HIV.Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria

To increase country ownership and sustainability of laboratory services and programs, the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, led by MSH, identified the need to develop the program leadership and management capacity of local medical laboratory associations in Nigeria. 

 {Video screenshot}MSH and partners developed the Pharmaceutical Leadership Development Program (PLDP) in South Africa in 2011.Video screenshot

Strong leadership and management are important factors in the delivery of quality health services, efficient use of resources, and achievement of positive health outcomes.

 {Photo credit: LMG/South Sudan}Midwives in South Sudan receive capacity development training through the Leadership, Management and Governance for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course.Photo credit: LMG/South Sudan

This story originally appeared on the Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG) Project Blog. The LMG project is funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) with a consortium of partners. More women die during childbirth in South Sudan than in any country on Earth—over 2,000 mothers per 100,000 live births.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Charlotte Abroman, midwife, Kongoti Center for Rural Health, Daoukro.Photo credit: MSH

Leadership Development Program Plus (LDP+) leads to dramatic rise in antenatal care visits “I was both aware of the challenges that existed and frustrated at not being able to meet them,” said Charlotte Abroman, midwife at the Kongoti Center for Rural Health, discussing low antenatal clinic visit rates. In Côte d’Ivoire as a whole, 70 percent of pregnant women attend all four ANC visits, but in Abroman’s area of Kongoti, only 11 percent made all the visits. In the health district of Daoukro, which includes Kongoti and other towns, the rate was 24 percent.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

Leadership, management, and governance skills are critical for medical, nursing, and public health professionals. The MSH-led, US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project with project partner Amref Health Africa developed an action-based learning, in-service certificate course to equip midwife managers with the leadership, management, and governance skills they need to deliver quality health services.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Dr. Ihsanullah Shahir (third from left), Director General of Human Resources within Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health, used the Leadership Development Program (LDP) to develop local solutions with local leaders.Photo credit: MSH

Dr. Ihsanullah Shahir, Director General of Human Resources within Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health, began work as a young doctor in mountainous Bamyan province during what he calls “an emergency situation during the war.” In 2004, Shahir became the Provincial Health Director in Bamyan Province. I had limited knowledge, but I got help from colleagues. We established everything from zero. Shahir and his colleagues worked to ensure coverage of the Basic Package of Health Services.

 {Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH}Representatives from the German Enterprise for International Cooperation (GIZ) facilitating a communications workshop with the Ukrainian Center for Socially Dangerous Disease Control, in partnership with LMG-Ukraine.Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH

In November 2013, Ukrainians took to the streets in Kyiv, claiming Maidan Square to protest corruption and to demand the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement, rejected by the now ex-Ukrainian President Yanukovich.  By the beginning of 2014, the situation reached a boiling point and the riots in Kyiv were turning into full-blown urban warfare.

 {Photo credit: Benjamín Balarezo/MSH}Community leaders and authorities participate in first module of program for Moral Leadership and Community Management.Photo credit: Benjamín Balarezo/MSH

For many communities in Peru, the cultivation of illegal coca for drug trafficking, far from bringing prosperity, has only brought them fear and instability, an eroding community, and caused serious health problems primarily affecting women and children. This dark landscape is now changing for 41 rural communities in the Huanuco and Ucayali regions, who, in 2012 signed an agreement with the Peruvian government to stop growing coca.

 {Photo credit: Amélie Sow-Dia/MSH}Fortunée Kabeya and her newborn baby at the Muaka Health Center in Mwene Ditu, August 2014.Photo credit: Amélie Sow-Dia/MSH

It is 1 p.m. in Mwene Ditu, a crossroads town in the province of Kasaï Oriental, the nexus of diamond mining in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Fortunée Kabeya* has just given birth at the Muaka health center. Céline Bukasa, the head nurse, assisted Fortunée’s delivery, and mother and baby are doing well.

 {Photo credit: Samuel Edet/MSH} A large crowd observes the festivities.Photo credit: Samuel Edet/MSH

There is no way we can achieve the presidential mandate of 30 percent health coverage by 2015 without tapping into Nigeria’s informal sector. Community-Based Health Insurance (CBHI) is therefore a veritable tool to ensure wider coverage, increased ownership, and an entrenched culture of health insurance among the Nigerian public. 

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