COVID-19: Responding to the Pandemic: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

COVID-19 is changing how malaria projects maintain programming in Nigeria. Before the pandemic, trainings and capacity-building efforts were conducted face-to-face, coupled with breakout sessions, where attendees huddled to discuss a topic or idea in-depth. But as public health experts recommend physical distancing to curb the spread of the coronavirus, face-to-face interactions are no longer considered a safe way to meet or share knowledge. To bridge this communications gap, organizations and programs worldwide are now utilizing virtual resources—an approach that has not been widely tested in training large groups of people in Nigeria, especially health care workers.

Behavior Change Is Key to Fighting COVID-19 but Getting the Government to Finance Such Activities Is Not EasyDEVEX: Inequality and Corruption: Why Peru is Losing Its COVID-19 BattleEdgar Medina Figueroa, MSH-Peru Executive Director, July 1, 2020Peru mobilized quickly to fight COVID-19, but the country still finds itself with one of the highest death rates in the region.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

In the wake of the US decision to terminate the relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO), Pandemic Action Network and leading global health organizations have published a brief paper outlining some of the critical steps that the world needs to take to prevent pandemics. The report sets out a key challenge for global leaders to work together in an unprecedented way to end COVID-19 as swiftly as possible and prepare for future pandemic threats.The report, published jointly by the Pandemic Action Network, ONE, PATH, Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), Global Health Security Agenda

Family home outside of Pucallpa, Peru. Photo Credit: Leslie Alsheimer

Three-quarters of all emerging diseases are zoonotic, and yet most countries do not have a comprehensive animal health surveillance network. In an opinion article for The Hill, “Can Veterinarians Save Us from the Next Pandemic?,” MSH’s Senior External Affairs Officer, Ashley Arabasadi, and Dr. Tracey McNamara, a veterinary pathologist who played the catalyst’s role in identifying West Nile Virus, discuss the need to invest in animal disease surveillance to prevent the next pandemic.Read their commentary in The Hill, here.

 {Photo credit: Doris Bota/MTaPS}Participants relax after an infection prevention and control training in Kisii, Kenya.Photo credit: Doris Bota/MTaPS

Since March 18, 2020, the USAID Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) Program has been collaborating with the Kenyan Ministry of Health (MoH) to roll out a series of training-of-trainers (ToT) courses to help the government contain and manage the COVID-19 pandemic.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

The USAID MTaPS Program, led by MSH, is on the frontlines supporting USAID’s efforts to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus in high-risk countries. The program’s mandate includes advancing the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) and is, therefore, well equipped to respond to global public health emergencies such as the current outbreak.  MTaPS has formed a COVID-19 response team to assist countries in developing a rapid response action plan to manage the outbreak.

 {Photo Credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Two women wash their hands outside Nathenje Health Center.Photo Credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

Story and photos by Rejoice Phiri, Communications Manager, ONSE Health ActivityMalawi’s media is awash with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has changed daily life in the country, as well as worldwide.

Read this blog on the CSEM websiteAuthors: Justin Koonin, Dheepa Rajan, Eliana Monteforte, Marjolaine NicodIn September 2019, at the UN High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage, world leaders endorsed the most ambitious and comprehensive political declaration on health in history.This Declaration included a commitment to “engage all relevant stakeholders, including civil society, the private sector and academia, as appropriate, through the establishment of participatory and transparent multi-stakeholder platforms and partnerships”[1].The test of that commitment has

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}The Koboko District Rapid Response team and partners discuss medicines and medical supplies to order through the eELMISPhoto credit: MSH staff

Read the original story on the USAID websiteIdentifying opportunities to improve global health requires innovation and creative thinking.  In developing countries such as Uganda, the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting an already-strained health system. Access to primary health care remains difficult for many people, and quality of care is inconsistent, with limited drugs, supplies, and human resources.

{Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Mobile teams broadcast information to community members regarding COVID-19 transmission, self-quarantine, and other preventive measures.Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

On April 2, 2020, Malawi’s President Peter Mutharika confirmed the country's first cases of COVID-19.

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