Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health: Our Impact

Police leaders at a LINKAGES training. Photo credit: LINKAGES/MSH

At the beginning of LINKAGES, peer educator Maria* was training female sex workers (FSW) on HIV prevention in a busy nightclub in downtown Luanda when police detained her. Maria spent several hours at the police station before she was able to explain that she was an outreach worker with the Associação Beneficente Cristã (ABC) under the LINKAGES Project.

{Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Read the announcement in EnglishDes prix totalisant près de 600 000 dollars US destinés à améliorer la santé des femmes, des enfants, et des adolescents ont été attribués à des coalitions de la société civile dans neuf paysManagement Sciences for Health (MSH), le Mécanisme de financement mondial (Global Financing Facility-GFF), et le Partenariat pour la santé des mères, des nouveau-nés et des enfants (Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health-PMNCH) sont heureux d'annoncer les

{Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

>>Cliquez ici pour lire l'annonce en français Awards totaling nearly $600,000 to improve women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health made to civil society coalitions in nine countries.Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Global Financing Facility (GFF), and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (PMNCH) are pleased to announce the recipients of the first round of funding from the Small Grants Mechanism to support civil society engagement, alignment, and coordinated action for improved women’s, children’s, and adolescents&rs

 {Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}A mother holds her newborn at a hospital in Mwene-Ditu, Democratic Republic of the CongoPhoto Credit: Warren Zelman

By Kimberly Whipkey, Advocacy Manager, White Ribbon AllianceThis story was originally published by the White Ribbon AllianceNearly five years into the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) era, maternal mortality rates worldwide are still unacceptably high. Why?It’s not for a lack of technical know-how.

Kitty (far left) attends a Community Health Action Group meeting to discuss ways to improve their reach in the community.

Story by Sam Sande, District WASH Officer, and Rejoice Phiri, Communications Manager, USAID’s ONSE Health Activity“Faliya and I have built over 14 toilets and we are not slowing down,” says Kitty Kachingwe Likuda, a resident of Khanyizira in Malawi’s southern district of Mulanje.The lack of proper sanitation and hygiene remains one of the greatest barriers to global development. Approximately 47% of households in rural areas of Malawi still lack access to an improved sanitation facility, which commonly leads to waterborne illnesses such as diarrhea.

 {Photo credit: David J. Olson}Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé, president of Muso Yiriwa Ton.Photo credit: David J. Olson

by David OlsonThis story was originally published by K4Health The first five times the sales manager of Keneya Jemu Kan came looking for Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé to talk about her women’s association selling condoms and other health products, she ran away and hid, so terrified was she of the prospect of having to work with condoms.But the sales manager’s persistence paid off. Eventually, they talked, and Madame Togo has become such an enthusiastic condom promoter, she is known as Mama Condom.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

What is the purpose of the USAID-funded Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceuticals Services (MTaPS) program, and what will the program accomplish?MTaPS recently published a collection of brief publications that provide information on the program’s objectives and planned activities.

{Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Midwife Chirford Semu stands in the labor and delivery room at Bowe Health Center, in Dowa district, Malawi.Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

Chirford Semu knows that time is of the essence when complications arise during labor and delivery. He is a midwife at Bowe Health Center in Dowa district, one of the most remote areas in Malawi. This single health center serves an estimated 42,445 people. Of these, 9,762 are women of childbearing age, and there are approximately 2,100 expected births per year in the district. Women who develop birth complications at this facility have to travel 96 kilometers on unpaved roads to reach Dowa District Hospital, the district’s referral facility.

{Photo credit: M4ID}Photo credit: M4ID

Judy Moraa is one of many women who participated in the Lea Mimba Pregnancy Clubs at one of six health facilities in Kakamega County in western Kenya.

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A health worker checks malaria commodities at a private clinic in Balaka, Malawi.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

“Malaria is a very big problem that we are still fighting,” says Dr. Samantha Musasa, Medical Officer for Balaka district, located in Southern Malawi. Indeed, Malaria kills some 435,000 people around the world each year, the majority of them children. In Malawi, the prevalence of malaria among children under five remains dangerously high, at around 23.6%.

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