Mali: Our Impact

Members of the KJK team (from left to right: Mariame Sene Diallo, Hawa Coulibaly Kone, Hammouda Bellamine, Aicha Diarra and Justine Dembele)

Led by Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Communication Programs and in partnership with Management Sciences for Health, the Palladium Group, and a number of local implementing partners in Mali, the USAID-funded Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK) project (communication and health prevention) aims to promote key healthy behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities.

 {Photo credit: David J. Olson}Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé, president of Muso Yiriwa Ton.Photo credit: David J. Olson

by David OlsonThis story was originally published by K4Health The first five times the sales manager of Keneya Jemu Kan came looking for Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé to talk about her women’s association selling condoms and other health products, she ran away and hid, so terrified was she of the prospect of having to work with condoms.But the sales manager’s persistence paid off. Eventually, they talked, and Madame Togo has become such an enthusiastic condom promoter, she is known as Mama Condom.

{Photo credit: Alpha Macky Kane}Photo credit: Alpha Macky Kane

On March 8, the USAID-funded Communications and Promotion of Health (Keneya Jemu Kan or KJK) project in Mali celebrated International Women’s Day to highlight both the challenges women face in exercising their right to health and opportunities to overcome systemic barriers that affect women’s health and wellbeing.KJK, which aims to promote key health behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities, wanted to use the day to honor the work of the women engaged in the project while promoting good health practices for all women in Mali.

A student from the center for educational activities of Sévaré reads of poem about female genital mutilation.

I do not agree with cutting I didn’t choose to be born a woman So why should I suffer By this removal that I have to endure?   On International Youth Day, communities around the globe will call for – and create – safe spaces for youth to express themselves, influence decision making, seek confidential care and information, and call out violations of their human rights. This year, youth highlighted the urgency of ending gender-based violence, female genital mutilation (FGM), and child marriage in a very public space in central Mali.

On May 21, during the 71st World Health Assembly, member states adopted a new digital health resolution. It urges member states to better utilize digital technologies as a means of promoting equitable, affordable universal health coverage (UHC), including reaching vulnerable populations. The resolution also calls on members to analyze the implications of digital health to achieve health related sustainable development goals.

{Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo}Survivor and subject of story.Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo

Originally published on Rights & Realities blog The FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health, with support from the Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) Humanitarian Sub-cluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages in Mopti to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. This is her account as told to Adama Sanogo/FCI Program of MSH.

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

The manager of a community health center dispenses family planning commodities in Mali. {Photo credit: MSH.}

By Dr. Constance Toure, Dr. Suzanne Diarra, Dr. Modibo Diarra, Dr. Yssouf Diallo Access to family planning methods has been challenging in many parts of Mali – even before the US had to shut off direct aid to the Malian government. With funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program, has been supporting Mali’s Ministry of Health through its Direction de la Pharmacie et des Médicaments (DPM) to estimate contraceptive needs.