Madagascar

 {Photo Credit: Rhiana Smith}Aziz Abdallah, DHSS Project Director, MSH, greets guests at end-of-project eventPhoto Credit: Rhiana Smith

The District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery (DHSS) Project shared its achievements on Wednesday, March 7, after five years of work to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS in Malawi. Guests gathered at the Bingu International Conference Center in Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, for an end-of-project event that featured speakers from DHSS, the Ministry of Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH), which led the DHSS Project,  

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

Arlington, VA— A new compendium released today by the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, implemented by Management Sciences for Health, offers an in-depth look at 12 innovative and promising efforts to strengthen pharmaceutical systems. Released via a new website, Case Studies in Pharmaceutical Systems Strengthening documents the lasting effect of interventions on the people, processes, and structures that comprise a pharmaceutical system and includes actionable lessons and recommendations.

Ebola health care workers at a home during the October 2014 outbreak. Photo Credit: Fred Hartman/MSHEbola health care workers at a home during the October 2014 outbreak. Photo Credit: Fred Hartman/MSH

 Arlington, VA—Management Sciences for Health (MSH) stands with the global health community, and with the millions of people we serve across the globe each day, to urge the U.S. government to reconsider planned reductions to programs that are essential to health and national security, and to focus on continuing to invest in strengthening health systems in the world’s poorest countries.

{Photo Credit: Liza Talukder}Jahidul Hasan works on the adverse drug event report.Photo Credit: Liza Talukder

The Directorate General of Drug Administration (DGDA)—with technical assistance from the USAID-funded SIAPS program, implemented by MSH—officially launched Bangladesh’s national pharmacovigilance (PV) program in 2013. After being first introduced at 20 private and public hospitals, and 13 pharmaceutical companies, the DGDA and SIAPS have organized trainings for focal persons to build their skills and knowledge on PV and increase adverse drug event (ADE) reporting.

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina}Lynda Razafiharilalao, a Malagasy community health volunteer, shows various modules of the mHealth app to a fellow volunteer.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

In rural areas of Madagascar, community health volunteers (CHVs) are instrumental in improving maternal and child health services. Their activities include raising awareness on healthy behaviors, child growth monitoring, family planning counseling and services, and treatment of simple illnesses, such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria. As CHVs are part of Madagascar’s health system, their activity reports feed into the national health information system.

{Photo Credit: MSH}Community members discuss plague response.Photo Credit: MSH

Bubonic plague is endemic in Madagascar. Typically, the country experiences 400 to 600 cases of the disease each year. However, in 2017 the plague also took the pneumonic form. Between August 1 and November 26 there were 2,417 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases of plague, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than three-quarters of the cases were clinically classified as pneumonic.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

On the fifth anniversary of the UHC movement, we reflect on a few key steps to reach UHC.

In the five years since the United Nations adopted the momentous resolution that established the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) movement—achieving equitable, affordable access to high-quality health services for all who need them—countries have made significant progress toward providing basic health services to large segments of the population. This year marks an important moment for advancing UHC, as the new Director General of the World Health Organization, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, has made it abundantly clear that UHC is a priority for his administration.

That is great news. We have seen more countries and institutions working toward practical interventions that will make UHC a reality. We have seen them make financial and managerial commitments that will be critical for the global health community to achieve this noble, oft-lifesaving goal. But more work remains.

 

Achieving UHC through governance and financing

 

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/USAID Mikolo Project}Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/USAID Mikolo Project

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), a non-profit global health organization dedicated to saving lives and improving the health of some of the world’s most vulnerable people, announced today its renewed commitment to Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) by pledging to utilize its network of global, regional, and country projects to plan, support, sustain, and advocate for family planning programs that will serve nearly 1.2 million women by 2020.

Pages

Subscribe to Management Sciences for Health RSS