Tanzania

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

by Barbara K. Timmons, PhD

Tuberculosis (TB) is the pandemic that won’t go away. This ancient disease, the leading infectious cause of death in the world, kills more than a million people every year. One-third of the world’s population lives with latent TB infection. Despite being a preventable and curable disease, TB has been difficult to eradicate in part because of the stigma around the infection, preventing people from getting tested and continuing treatment. 

Ethiopia is among the 30 countries with the highest burden of TB in the world. One TB patient in Eastern Ethiopia, a woman from the small city of Dire Dawa, told researchers from Management Sciences for Health (MSH), “My husband’s family stigmatized me a lot. Since they knew that I am a TB patient, they didn’t sleep in our house. They sleep outdoors. They are not also willing to eat with me. . . . Before I was infected with TB, our social life with other people was great. The social life of Dire Dawa community is well known. But after they knew that I am a TB patient, only one of my neighbors sometimes comes to visit me.”

 {Photo credit: Elias Tuhereze}Photo caption: Professor Barnabas Nawangwe, Makerere University Vice Chancellor (4th left); UHSC Chief of Party Phillip Kamutenga (5th right); and Professor Josaphat Byamugisha (2nd right) with laboratory staff during the launch of RxSolution at Makerere University Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, November 2019.Photo credit: Elias Tuhereze

By Sheila MwebazeWhen Professor Josaphat Byamugisha and his team took over management of Makerere University Hospital in 2018, they quickly realized that they needed to make major infrastructural and operational improvements to the hospital and its affiliated clinics.

This story was originally published on the MTaPS Program website By Dr. Zubayer Hussain, Senior Manager, MTaPS The hospital in Bangladesh does not lack for new equipment. It has a shiny new machine to deliver anesthesia, for one, and a state-of-the-art x-ray machine. There’s one catch: Much of the equipment lies unused.

A community volunteers provides free HIV tests at a local market in Eyokponung, Nigeria. Photo Credit: Gwenn Dubourthournieu/MSH

This article was originally published in The Daily Trust

Following the economic recession of 2016, the Nigerian government developed an Economic Recovery and Growth Plan for 2017-2020 with three broad strategic objectives: restoring growth; investing in human capital; and building a globally competitive economy that achieves agriculture and food security, industrialization, improved transport infrastructures and energy sufficiency. Of these three objectives, one stands out: recognizing the importance of investing in human capital.

This represents a major shift by the government, as it previously focused mostly on developing infrastructure—a move that came at the expense of other sectors, including healthcare. Nigeria’s healthcare spending as a percentage of GDP remains one of the lowest in the world: about 0.6% of GDP in 2016, according to the World Bank. Per capita health spending by the Nigerian government is US$11, well below the recommended US$86 for low- and middle-income countries to deliver basic health services.

Ethiopia

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A community health volunteer in Madagascar shows the mobile phone she uses to record patient health data.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

On January 17, 2020, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) transferred a significant amount of essential medical equipment and supplies to Madagascar’s Ministry of Public Health.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

By Berhanemeskal Assefa Woldemariam, Principal Technical Advisor, Management Sciences for HealthAs a country with high rates of tuberculosis (TB), Ethiopia is working to expand services and improve TB case finding.

Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

This article was originally published in NextBillion.

What does scalable innovation in global health look like?

It could be a piece of software that provides faster access to blood supplies in Cameroon, an m-health platform that links virtual health coaches to people facing chronic illness in Nigeria, or an app that lets people use points to buy and exchange health products in Senegal, helping them save for out-of-pocket expenses. Or it might be a primary care service that reaches underserved people in India via telemedicine, or a microscope app that can diagnose breast and cervical cancers in remote areas in sub-Saharan Africa, where some 400,000 women die each year because they cannot access screening services.

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