{Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Patuma Mustafa (left) meets with members of Kalembo Health Center Management Committee.Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

Namaseko, nine months pregnant, was taking an afternoon nap at Kalembo Health Center in Balaka, Malawi when she suddenly needed a bathroom. As she carefully got up, she remembered that there was no toilet in the maternity wing; she would have to walk to the further side of the health center to use the pit latrines near the outpatient department.

MSH, as a partner to the government of Nigeria and sub-recipient to Catholic Relief Services, supports the Global Fund Malaria grant in building Nigeria’s capacity to implement malaria control activities, strengthen the quality of care for malaria, and improve the use of health data across 13 states.

{Pharmacist Mary Yeesuf dispenses medicine to a patient in Minna, Nigeria. Photo Credit: Gwenn Dubourthournieu}Pharmacist Mary Yeesuf dispenses medicine to a patient in Minna, Nigeria. Photo Credit: Gwenn Dubourthournieu

COVID-19 has highlighted the need for long-term investments in regulatory systems to secure faster access to medical products. During a recent Livestream hosted by MSH and Deloitte, Professor Mojisola Christianah Adeyeye, Director General of Nigeria’s National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC), emphasized the role regulatory agencies play in ensuring pharmaceutical system impact now and beyond the pandemic. One such breakthrough─local manufacturing─requires agencies shore up regulatory capacities and address challenges now. Prof. Adeyeye discusses how her agency supports the local manufacturing of medicines and prepares for the roll-out of vaccines against COVID-19.

{Doctors visit patients in Rabia Balkhi hospital, Kabul Afghanistan. Photo Credit: Afghan Eyes/Jawad Jalali}Doctors visit patients in Rabia Balkhi hospital, Kabul Afghanistan. Photo Credit: Afghan Eyes/Jawad Jalali

COVID-19 will impact the prevention and treatment of many diseases, and there are particularly grim possibilities for tuberculosis (TB), which could set back our progress toward its elimination. Fortunately, our emphasis on strengthening local health systems is helping to build resilience against this kind of shock. We reached out to MSH technical experts leading three new global and national TB programs to learn what’s on their minds as their teams begin implementation under a COVID-19 reality. They all agree: COVID-19 reminds us why we cannot become complacent, and when it comes to the global fight to eliminate TB, it is no longer business as usual. Read what Ersin TopcuogluDaniel Gemechu, and Ehsanullah Darwish had to say about how we can fundamentally improve the way countries fight TB.

A mother and child wait to receive services at Yombo Dispensary in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Photo credit: Megan Montgomery/MSH

Tanzania is unusually ambitious relative to other countries in sub-Saharan Africa and around the globe in having a national government-led digital health strategy, which it launched in 2013. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Technical Support Services Project (TSSP), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), is supporting Tanzania in overhauling its digital health infrastructure, including introducing electronic medical records, hospital facility management software, and a patient ID system. The end goal is to dramatically improve planning and case management for the country’s health services.

We asked TSSP Project Director Dr. Kenneth Lema and Deputy Director Paul Bwathondi for an update on how the country is progressing toward its ambitious digital health overhaul.

 

How has Tanzania’s ehealth movement been going?

A patient is reviewed by a medical officer at Mukuyuni Sub-County Hospital, Kenya. Photo credit: Urbanus Musyoki

In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, it is hard to think of anything else. And yet, the burden of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) — such as diabetes and hypertension — remains and continues to grow across low- and middle-income countries. Each year, NCDs kill 41 million people, equivalent to 71% of all deaths globally.

In Kenya, over half a million adults were living with diabetes in 2019, and 40% of them were unaware of their condition. Nearly half of hospital admissions and an estimated 55% of deaths in Kenya are associated with an NCD.

Recently, a World Health Organization survey, completed by 155 countries in May 2020, confirmed serious disruptions in prevention and treatment services for NCDs due to the COVID-19 pandemic, noting that low-income countries are most affected. These trends raise great concern, as people living with an NCD are heavily represented among serious cases of the virus. 

{As an HIV-positive woman with an HIV-negative husband and three HIV-negative sons, Margaret’s a role model for how women with HIV can thrive with access to essential services and information.  Photo by Patrick Meinhardt for IntraHealth International.}As an HIV-positive woman with an HIV-negative husband and three HIV-negative sons, Margaret’s a role model for how women with HIV can thrive with access to essential services and information. Photo by Patrick Meinhardt for IntraHealth International.

Health workers not only need water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services to prevent the spread of COVID-19 right now but also to provide safe essential health services every day. But 25% of health facilities around the world lack basic water services. One in six facilities doesn’t have hand hygiene services, such as soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub, available at points of care. And health workers in facilities in sub-Saharan Africa face even greater WASH challenges.

Two frontline health workers—Margaret Odera and Dr. Ann Phoya—recently called for improved WASH services during an event alongside the 75th United Nations General Assembly. Read on to find out what it’s like to be a health worker on the frontlines without WASH and the steps they are taking to access and improve WASH in Kenya and Malawi.

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