March 2014

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

MSH's Principal Technical Advisor for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (RMNCH) ">Beth Yeager has been named Chair of the Maternal Health Caucus of the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition. The Coalition, a prestigious global organization with members from the public, private, and non-governmental sectors, works to ensure access to affordable, high quality reproductive health supplies worldwide. The Maternal Health Caucus serves as a forum for addressing the challenges of access to reproductive health commodities, particularly magnesium sulfate, misoprostol, and oxytocin.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

The Millennium Development Goals, due to expire next year, have defined an era of global health. Since their adoption in 2000, the global AIDS response has scaled up massively; childhood immunization has become the norm in most settings; and many more women can access the family planning and reproductive healthcare they need. The MDGs coincided with, and perhaps helped to usher, a “Golden Age” of global health funding, which supported hard work and innovation that saved millions of lives.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}A community health worker uses a mobile phone for health information while caring for a sick child in Salima, Malawi.Photo credit: MSH staff

Natalie Campbell and Elizabeth McLean of MSH and colleagues co-authored a new journal article, "Taking knowledge for health the extra mile: participatory evaluation of a mobile phone intervention for community health workers in Malawi," in the latest issue of Global Health: Science and Practice.

This post originally appeared on the K4Health blog.

 {Photo credit: Juliette Mutheu/MSH}Dr John Masasabi, Director of Policy, Planning and Health Care Financing, Kenya Ministry of Health, giving the keynote address at the launch.Photo credit: Juliette Mutheu/MSH

As a government we cannot work alone. However, it is important that those contributing to achieving the government’s vision of a healthy Kenya be guided by standards that encourage them to provide a certain level of quality that is acceptable and desirable.

These were the words of Dr. John Masasabi, the director of policy, planning and health care financing in Kenya’s Ministry of Health, as he launched the Institutional Strengthening Standards for Kenyan Civil Society Organisations, organized by the USAID-funded FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project, led by MSH in partnership with Pact, Danya International, and the African Capacity Alliance.

The event took place at the AMREF Headquarters & International Training Center Grounds in Nairobi, Kenya on February 18, 2014.

 {Photo credit: Alison Corbacio.}A child in Rajasthan, India drinks from a public water source.Photo credit: Alison Corbacio.

Have you ever thought about water? I mean, really thought about the quality of the water you drink or use for your personal hygiene? Clean water is something many of us take for granted, but billions of people around the world lack access to a dependable source of fresh water and acceptable sanitation facilities.

This year, I joined a coalition of advocates from dozens of organizations to support HR 2901, otherwise known as The Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act. The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives in August 2013 by Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) and was referred to the House Foreign Affairs Committee. It has broad bipartisan support. This bill does not ask for any new funding from Congress; instead, it seeks to use existing funds to improve monitoring and evaluation of WASH projects, increase communication between agencies, and promote partnerships and cooperation among stakeholders.

"At the Duka" tells the story of a Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services Program (SIAPS) project to increase early detection of tuberculosis in Tanzania.

SIAPS partnered with the Tanzanian National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Program to train drug dispensers on the symptoms of TB, so that they could refer clients with these symptoms to TB diagnostic and treatment centers for follow up.

The video is narrated by David Mabirizi (SIAPS Principal Technical Advisor), and features Gabriel Daniel (SIAPS Principal Technical Advisor), Edmund Rutta (SIAPS Senior Technical Advisor), and Salama Mwatawala (SIAPS Senior Technical Advisor).

Watch video

 {Photo credit: Durmuş Şahin}(left to right) Dr. Raed Arafat, Chair of the Conference, Secretary of State, Ministry of Health of Romania; Dr. Martin van den Boom, TB Program Focal Officer, WHO Regional Office for Europe; Francis (Kofi) Aboagye-Nyame, Director, SIAPS Program; and Dr. Joel Keravec, Head of Operations, Global Drug Facility, Stop TB Partnership, at the First Conference on Pharmaceutical Management for TB and M/XDR-TB for the WHO European Region.Photo credit: Durmuş Şahin

The highest rate of multi-drug resistant (M) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) cases of tuberculosis (TB) is found in the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region. The Consolidated Action Plan to Prevent and Combat M/XDR-TB in the WHO European Region specifies that, by the end of 2013, all member states assure provision of an interrupted supply of quality first- and second-line medicines for treatment of all TB and M/XDR-TB patients.

Safe and rational use of these medicines is also a challenge. To deal with these demanding challenges means an increased need to strengthen pharmaceutical management, especially in the areas of second-line TB medicines management, new TB medicines, and novel treatment regimens.

 {Photo credit: © 2011 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare}A health care provider dispenses TB drugs for Directly Observed Treatment (DOTS) at Tete's Urban Health Center, Mozambique.Photo credit: © 2011 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

Successfully combating the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic requires that national TB programs (NTPs) prevent new infections and ensure that current patients are cured. Although the treatment for drug-sensitive TB is very effective, curing the disease requires that patients adhere to a strict daily regimen of multiple pills for six to nine months. Adding to the challenge is the fact that treatment for drug-resistant TB is longer, more toxic, and less effective.

All medicines carry some risk of adverse events, and anti-TB medicines are no exception. In addition to threatening the health of patients, adverse events, if not well managed, may also result in individuals stopping their treatment early. Patients who prematurely discontinue treatment may remain sick, develop resistance to the medicines, and spread TB to others in their community.

To support NTPs and health professionals efforts to meet treatment goals and improve the safety of anti-TB medicines, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program developed the first guide of its kind on minimizing risks associated with anti-TB medicines.

 {Photo credit: MSH.}MSH representatives attend the iCCM Symposium. From left to right: Jean Fidele Ilunga Mubay (DRC Ministry of Health), David Collins, Pascaline Hareimana (MSH/Burundi), Papy Luntadila (MSH/DRC), Ciro Franco, Jane Briggs, Naia Embeke Narcisse (MSH/DRC), Colin Gilmartin, Zina Jarrah, Uzaib Saya.Photo credit: MSH.

In the absence of effective treatment and access to quality health services, diarrhea, malaria, and pneumonia remain the leading causes of child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa and cause nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five years old. To improve access to life-saving treatment among children, many African countries have begun implementing and scaling-up integrated community case management (iCCM), a strategy that focuses on the delivery of timely and low-cost interventions at the community level by community health workers.

Understanding the potential impact and the importance of iCCM as an effective means to reduce child mortality, more than 400 researchers, donors, government, implementers, and partners representing 35 sub-Saharan African countries convened on March 3-5 in Accra, Ghana for the 2014 Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) Evidence Review Symposium.

The objectives of the Symposium were to review the current state of the art and evidence of iCCM implementation and to assist African countries to integrate and take action on key iCCM findings presented during the evidence symposium. Among those in attendance were 10 Management Sciences for Health (MSH) representatives from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the United States.

 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera.}Community health workers participate in a workshop outside a hospital in Nyagatare, Rwanda.Photo credit: Todd Shapera.

Allowing the lens to capture the state of global health—from the brutal reality of childbirth in places where health workers, clean water, and roads are non-existent to how insurance reform in countries such Rwanda or the education of young girls in Nigeria benefit those communities—offers intimate glimpses into moments of pain and triumph. Yet, "We all have the same camera, but we each follow our own passions; our own hearts," 2014 Photo Fellow Mark Tuschman reminded those gathered at an opening reception for the SDN/MSH Winners of the 2014 Call for Entries on Using the Power of Photography to Promote Global Awareness.