April 2013

Mildred shares her story of surviving XDR-TB at an event honoring "TB Champions" in DC; Ambassador Goosby listens. {Photo: E. Delmotte/MSH.}Photo: E. Delmotte/MSH.

Mildred Fernando lives and works in the Philippines for the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program. Mildred spoke at several World TB Day events in Washington, DC, including at a senate briefing and an event honoring TB survivors and advocates (watch video). The interview below first appeared on the SIAPS blog.

It all began in November 2001 for Mildred Fernando when she was diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), a preventable and curable disease which caused the death of 1.4 million people in 2011. She was only 19 years old, working on completing her last semester in college when she contracted TB from her father who sadly succumbed to it two years later.

Karen Chio of MSH developed the K4Health Blended Learning Guide in collaboration with Liz McLean of MSH and Sara Mazursky and Lisa Mwaikambo of JHU-CCP (2013).Karen Chio of MSH developed the K4Health Blended Learning Guide in collaboration with Liz McLean of MSH and Sara Mazursky and Lisa Mwaikambo of JHU-CCP (2013).

Cross-posted with permission from the K4Health blogK4Health is a USAID project, led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for Communication Programs (JHU-CCP), with partners FHI-360 and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

This week’s Lancet returns the spotlight to Option B+, an innovative strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV which was first developed in Malawi with technical assistance from MSH. Four letters respond to the concern that international organizations have too quickly endorsed the Option B+ approach of providing lifelong triple antiretroviral therapy (ART), irrespective of CD4 count, to pregnant women with HIV in high-burden countries.

MSH experts Scott Kellerman, Jonathan Jay and Jonathan Quick argue that “a strong case exists for expanding research on Option B+, but not for impeding countries that pursue it on the basis of available evidence and programmatic experience:”

Rwandan physicians receive continuing professional development. (Photo credit: C. Tran Ngoc/MSH)Rwandan physicians receive continuing professional development. (Photo credit: C. Tran Ngoc/MSH)

Maintaining state-of-the-art skills and knowledge is crucial for physicians. But in most developing countries, the lack of structured or ongoing educational activities has pushed medical doctors to travel abroad to benefit from the most recent expertise.

To solve that problem---and improve Rwanda's health system---the Rwanda Medical Council (RMC) launched the continuing professional development program in 2011. The continuing professional development sustains practitioners' knowledge through workshops, seminars, practical sessions, and research.

The USAID Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP), led by Management Sciences for Health, provided technical and financial support to the RMC for the implementation of the continuing professional development program by developing strategic and monitoring and evaluation plans, helping to run an office, accrediting health professional societies as continuing professional development providers, and preparing the national sensitization campaign.

We know what works to save the lives of children under five years old: We know which antibiotic to give for treating pneumonia, for example. Yet only 31% of children with suspected pneumonia receive antibiotics. And two million children die from pneumonia and diarrhea each year.

In recent years, commitments from the government and major donors have led to improved tuberculosis (TB) control in Indonesia, with reductions in both prevalence and incidence. The nation’s economic status has also improved; however, this has caused many donors to reduce their contributions to the nation’s health programs.  Compounding this financial challenge is the rising prevalence of drug resistant strains of TB that further tax the health system with the cost of expensive services and medicines needed to care for these patients.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) under USAID’s TB CARE I project, is assisting the Ministry of Health’s National TB Program (NTP) to develop ways to increase domestic financing for Indonesia’s TB control initiatives. Possible solutions include: increased contributions from national health insurance and government budgets, corporate social responsibility programs, and improvements in cost-effectiveness and efficiency.

Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).

On the eve of World Tuberculosis Day, Voice of America interviewed Dr. Stephen Macharia, the TB CARE I country director for South Sudan.

During the interview (transcript, PDF), Dr. Macharia discussed the TB epidemic in South Sudan, TB CARE I project achievements, and the way forward for improving funding for TB services and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) control in fragile states, like South Sudan.

TB CARE I is a USAID-funded project, led by KNCV TB Foundation with partners, including Management Sciences for Health.

Voice of America, the official external broadcast institution of the United States federal government, produces nearly 1,500 hours of news and programs each week for an estimated global audience of 123 million people.

Cross-posted with permission from the Global Health Knowledge Collaborative.

“What is important to you about KM [knowledge management] and why?” was the first question that some 40 small groups discussed, sitting at paper-covered tables with colored markers that invited participants to doodle out loud. The papers and the host at each table captured their conversations, their questions, opinions and exclamation marks.

Within seconds the room was abuzz, with energy, opinions, experiences and wisdom.

Two graphic facilitators captured the essence of the conversation on a 24 by 8 foot mural that slowly filled over the next 6 hours:

GHKC: knowledge wall (Image from Global Health Knowledge Collaborative)