Management Sciences for Health (MSH)

 {Screenshot of MSH's 100-plus projects.}InterAction's new interactive NGO Aid Map.Screenshot of MSH's 100-plus projects.

As a member of InterAction, an alliance comprised of more than 180 organizations, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is excited to announce our participation and support of their newly launched NGO Aid Map.

The NGO Aid Map aims to increase the amount of publicly available data on international development and humanitarian response by providing detailed project information through interactive maps and data visualizations. In addition to highlighting where and how development dollars are being spent, the NGO Aid Map also encourages transparency, provides context on project data, and serves as a tool to education the world about the work of US non-governmental organizations (NGOs). With data that is searchable by country, sector, organization, and donor, this map is a great way for the public to gain a better perspective of the work of NGOs around the world.

Attendees of the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) staff presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013. (Photo credits: C. Lander & J. Briggs / MSH)

5thBDay badge in white background.5thBDay badge in white background.

Every child deserves a fifth birthday. It seems simple enough. But for many children in the world — especially in countries with the highest burden of child mortality, such as India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Pakistan and Ethiopia — preventable deaths will claim their lives, before they reach the age of five.

Today, USAID launched an ongoing child survival awareness campaign, called, “Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday.”

The “5th Birthday” campaign kicked off with a briefing event at Kaiser Family Foundation, featuring USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah and other experts. Dr. Shah and colleagues stressed that reducing the burden of child mortality is critical to our future as a global community.

While the global community has made great strides reducing child mortality, inequality in child mortality remains: several regions and countries continue to shoulder the greatest burden and loss of life.

Unpublished
Subscribe to RSS - Management Sciences for Health (MSH)