global health

{Marian W. Wentworth visits with health workers during a trip to Uganda in 2017. Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Marian W. Wentworth visits with health workers during a trip to Uganda in 2017. Photo credit: Warren Zelman

I began my career in the private sector almost always as the only woman in the room. Like many women of my generation, I experienced the kind of casual sexism that for too long was considered acceptable. But I also experienced firsthand more abusive forms of discrimination.  As I moved up in the organization, I began to see how sexism affected other women around me. I remember reviewing male and female candidates who were being assessed for readiness for promotion and noticing a distinct trend: The female candidates were assessed on their achievements; the male candidates on their potential. This situation worsened as candidates were actually selected for roles. Average achieving, “high potential” male candidates were being promoted over women who had tangible track records of accomplishments. While the trend was obvious, the solutions were not. We tried a series of different ways to shift this trend in our organization, but none produced quick results.  How we assess potential — and in whom — is but one example of the kind of systemic sexism that forces women to work harder to achieve professional success, and why some of us find it too much to fight.

 {Screenshot of MSH's 100-plus projects.}InterAction's new interactive NGO Aid Map.Screenshot of MSH's 100-plus projects.

As a member of InterAction, an alliance comprised of more than 180 organizations, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is excited to announce our participation and support of their newly launched NGO Aid Map.

The NGO Aid Map aims to increase the amount of publicly available data on international development and humanitarian response by providing detailed project information through interactive maps and data visualizations. In addition to highlighting where and how development dollars are being spent, the NGO Aid Map also encourages transparency, provides context on project data, and serves as a tool to education the world about the work of US non-governmental organizations (NGOs). With data that is searchable by country, sector, organization, and donor, this map is a great way for the public to gain a better perspective of the work of NGOs around the world.

Did you notice that our website looks and feels really different?

We've redesigned and rebuilt our site from the ground up: showcasing our unique technical expertise and staff, values, global footprint, and mission to save lives and improve health among the poorest and most vulnerable around the world. 

We also have integrated our Global Health Impact blog into the website to continue cutting-edge discussions on global health.  

And we've made the new MSH.org easier to use.     

Learn more about the new MSH.org

Watch the short video -- and see some of the new features firsthand:

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Devex interviews MSH President & CEO Dr. Jonathan D. Quick at the Clinton Global Initiative 2012. {Photo credit: Devex.}Photo credit: Devex.

Devex interviews MSH President & CEO Dr. Jonathan D. Quick at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting.

"The last decade has been a stunning decade for global health. If you look at what's been achieved in AIDS, TB, malaria, --- less so in family planning, but still progress --- it's been an amazing decade," says MSH President & CEO Dr. Jonathan D. Quick in an interview with Devex.

Togolese health hut. {Photo credit: S.Holtz/Peace Corps.}Photo credit: S.Holtz/Peace Corps.

The World Health Statistics 2012 report released this year reveals a mixed bag of amazing progress and underachievement.

The report --- the World Health Organization's (WHO) annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States --- includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets.

Countries have achieved amazing success in some areas and little or no progress in others. Here are some highlights:

{Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Over 100 conference delegates came together at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development last week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to strategize smart solutions to global development and poverty reduction while promoting environmental concerns such as clean energy, sustainability, and equitable use of resources.  Popularly known as “Rio+20” --- for occurring twenty years after the 1992 Earth Summit  --- the three days of high-level meetings attended by heads of state and government and high level representatives resulted in “The Future We Want,” a 53-page document that outlines and renews global commitments to sustainable, earth-friendly development.

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The NCD Alliance announced today that delegates at the 65th World Health Assembly are likely to pass a historic target on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) tomorrow, May 26.

The NCD Alliance, a network of over 2,000 civil society organizations, including Management Sciences for Health, urged delegates to "support comprehensive Global Monitoring Framework and Targets; support the establishment of a Global Coordinating Platform on NCDs; and put NCDs at the heart of the post-2015 development agenda."

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