Universal Health Coverage

Universal Health Coverage (UHC)
 {Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH.}MSH country representatives, Mr. Bada Pharasi (South Africa), Ziyanda Ngoma (South Africa), Ana Diaz (Angola), Dr. Negussu Mekonnen (Ethiopia), and Percy Ramirez (Angola).Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH.

Pablos-Méndez Applauds and Encourages MSH Representatives and Partners at DC Country Health Impact Fair

Representatives from 13 MSH countries—Afghanistan, Angola, Cote d’Ivoire, DRC, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda—shared stories and materials about the lives saved and health impact of MSH’s work, in partnership with US Agency for International Development (USAID) and others, at the MSH Country Health Impact Fair at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC, last week. Country ownership and health impact were common themes at the fair.

Ariel Pablos-Méndez (MD, MPH), assistant administrator for global health at the US Agency for International Development (USAID), addressed participants and attendees.

 {Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH}Ariel Pablos-Méndez (USAID) and Jonathan D. Quick (MSH) spoke at the MSH Country Health Impact Fair on April 9.Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH

MSH extends our thanks to Ariel Pablos-Méndez (MD, MPH), assistant administrator for global health at the US Agency for International Development (USAID), for addressing the MSH Country Health Impact Fair participants and attendees on Wednesday, April 9, at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

Happy World Health Day from MSH!

Ten country representatives, on behalf of MSH's 2,100-plus worldwide staff, wish YOU, your families, communities, and countries a happy World Health Day, and a world where EVERYONE has the opportunity for a healthy life! [Video below]

At MSH, we save lives by closing the gap between knowledge and action in public health, using proven approaches developed over 40 years to help leaders, health managers, and communities in low- and middle-income nations build stronger health systems for greater health impact. We envision a world where everyone has the opportunity for a healthy life!

 {Photo courtesy of Erik Törner/Individuell Människohjälp.}Health clinic in Kathmandu, Nepal.Photo courtesy of Erik Törner/Individuell Människohjälp.

Cross-posted with permission from The Wilson Center’s NewSecurityBeat.org.

The global maternal health agenda has been largely defined by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for the last decade and half, but what will happen after they expire in 2015? What kind of framework is needed to continue the momentum towards eliminating preventable maternal deaths and morbidities? [Video Below]

For a panel of experts gathered at the Wilson Center on February 20, universal health coverage is a powerful mechanism that may be crucial to finishing the job.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

This post originally appeared on the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) Blog as part of a series celebrating the one-year anniversary of The Lancet publishing “A Manifesto for Maternal Health post-2015,” co-authored by Ana Langer, Richard Horton, and Guerino Chalamilla.

In celebration of the one-year anniversary of the Manifesto for Maternal Health, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) congratulates our global community, including ministries of health, their partners, and the women we serve and work with, on the progress made toward creating a healthier world for mothers and their babies.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

The Millennium Development Goals, due to expire next year, have defined an era of global health. Since their adoption in 2000, the global AIDS response has scaled up massively; childhood immunization has become the norm in most settings; and many more women can access the family planning and reproductive healthcare they need. The MDGs coincided with, and perhaps helped to usher, a “Golden Age” of global health funding, which supported hard work and innovation that saved millions of lives.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Democratic Republic of the Congo.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

For over four decades, MSH has promoted equal access to healthcare for women and girls in more than 135 countries, as we work toward our vision of "a world where everyone has the opportunity for a healthy life." Health for all is a human right, and we believe strengthening health systems within a gender framework can help achieve this vision.

Gender shapes the ways in which health systems are planned, delivered, and experienced by beneficiaries and providers. To meet the specific health needs of women and girls, and to address gender within the health workforce, gender must be mainstreamed globally within and throughout health systems. What does that mean? Transforming the framework of health systems from being gender neutral (not taking the interests, needs, priorities, and contributions of different genders into account)—to being gender equitable (taking into account the interests, needs, priorities, and contributions of all).

Unpublished
 {Photo credit: MSH} (Left to right) Geoffrey Ratemo of Rutgers University; Senator Godliver Omondi, chair of United Disabled Persons of Kenya (UDPK); Dr. Abdi Dabar Maalim of the Transition Authority; Ndung’u Njoroge of the Transition Authority; and Evanson Minjire of Vision 2030 Secretariat at the first "Health for All" technical working group meeting in Kenya.Photo credit: MSH

The Health for All: Campaign for Universal Health Coverage is working to ensure that challenges that hinder access to quality health care in Kenya are addressed. The campaign aims to ensure that governments and stakeholders in health services delivery prioritize strengthening infrastructure, human resource for health, and health care financing to improve service delivery.

The campaign will official launch on April 28, 2014 with the theme, "Health systems strengthening for universal health coverage".

In preparation for this launch, the campaign team has recruited a Technical Working Group to spearhead the campaign. At the first meeting on January 21, 2014, the team identified the health systems strengthening theme and three sub themes for the campaign: strengthening infrastructure, human resource for health, and health care financing.

[Campaign partners at the messaging workshop in Kenya.] {Photo credit: MSH}Campaign partners at the messaging workshop in Kenya.Photo credit: MSH

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Universal Health Coverage