Blog

The strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries is central to the global effort to promote economic and social development through universal health coverage, reduce mortality, and improve health and sustainability of health care over the next 15 to 25 years. ("Health Systems Strengthening: 2015 and Beyond")

MSH has released a new information brief, "Health Systems Strengthening: 2015 and Beyond." The brief looks at lessons learned from working at all levels of the health system for over 40 years, outlines problems that must still be addressed and identifies specific ways to address them.

{Photo: Dominic Chavez}Photo: Dominic Chavez

The key element of any health system is the people who run it. Nowhere is this more true than in countries in the midst of, or recovering from, conflict. Indirect or direct threats faced by health workers exacerbate a population’s challenges in seeking and receiving health care.

In conflict settings, health workers may be forced to flee to safe havens as refugees, internally displaced people, or leave the country as migrants—if they have the means to do so. Some of the most capable are absorbed into international agencies. Those who remain frequently have insufficient resources to perform their jobs and must carry on as best as they can under daunting circumstances.

This situation has worsened in recent years with a growing number of direct attacks on health workers in fragile states, such as those against polio vaccinators in Pakistan and Nigeria. These blatant violations of the Geneva Conventions inhibit an already difficult environment for the delivery of health services and the recovery or development of the health system.

 {Photo credit: Dominic Chavez}South Sudan.Photo credit: Dominic Chavez

In December 2013, Africa’s newest country, South Sudan, imploded with violence between government forces and a rebel opposition led by a former vice president. The violence continues today despite regional efforts at reconciliation by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) and other state actors. The war, however, has not stopped South Sudan’s frontline health workers in their efforts to build a public health system, including access to medicines, from the ground up.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program is working with our South Sudanese partners to build the institutional, technical, and organizational capacity of the country’s health system—despite the ongoing conflict.

Our approach to strengthening the health system is based around the concept of embedment—where full-time technical advisors work with their South Sudanese counterparts on a day-to-day basis. This approach strengthens the technical and managerial capacity of local leaders, ensuring sustainability, while, at the same time, getting the job done: building a strong health system.

When Mearege gets really sick, her husband leaves town. Bedridden and in the care of her parents, Mearege gets tested and learns she--and her daugther--are HIV-positive. Through the support of mother mentors, trained by the Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care and Support Program (ENHAT-CS), Mearege finds solace, guidance, and healing -- and decides to have another child.

Mearege is one of many HIV-positive women in Ethiopia whose lives have been transformed, with the support of ENHAT-CS. Says Mearege:

I was able to have a healthy child because I followed up with the mentor mothers and applied their teaching...

Presented by ENHAT-CS in partnership with the National Network of Positive Women Ethiopians, this video is made possible by the generous support of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through the US Agency for International Development (USAID).

Watch video

 {Photo credit: Julie O'Brien/MSH}Haiti.Photo credit: Julie O'Brien/MSH

This post is part of MSH's Global Health Impact Blog series, Improving Health in Haiti: Remember, Rebuild. The post originally appeared on LMGforHealth.org, the blog of the US Agency for International Development (USAID)'s Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and a consortium of partners.

 {Photo credit: Warren Zelman}The MSH-led Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program is co-hosting the Global TB Conference 2015: Building the Post-2015 Agenda with the Stop TB Partnership Global Drug Facility.Photo credit: Warren Zelman
The US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), in collaboration with the Stop TB Partnership Global Drug Facility, will host a technical conference titled, “Building the Post-2015 Agenda: Novel Approaches to Improving Access to TB Medicines and Pharmaceutical Services” from March 2-6, 2015 at the Conrad Bangkok Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand.

The invitation-only conference will feature country experiences using tested approaches to prevent tuberculosis (TB) medicine stock-outs, increase TB case detection through private sector engagement, and ensure patient safety during TB treatment. National TB program (NTP) managers or deputies; NTP procurement and supply management leads; monitoring and evaluation leads for TB/data managers; donors; and World Health Organization and Stop TB Partnership partners are expected to attend.

 {Photo credit: Dominic Chavez}Brissault Eunise (seated) watching over her daughter Kerwencia, after receiving breast feeding classes.Photo credit: Dominic Chavez

This post is part of MSH's Global Health Impact Blog series, Improving Health in Haiti: Remember, Rebuild.

As January 12, 2015 marked the fifth anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and its partner organizations, including the Leadership, Management & Governance Project/Haiti, brought together Haitian and US government officials and key global health stakeholders for two days of meetings and events highlighting health progresses made in Haiti since 2010.

Haitian health leaders meet on Capitol Hill

 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Gisenyi District Hospital, Rwanda.Photo credit: Todd Shapera

The African Evaluation Journal (AEJ), the official journal for the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA), is calling for articles and peer reviewers for the special AEJ edition “Health Evaluations in Africa.” This process presents an exciting opportunity to participate in Africa’s contribution to the internationally-declared 2015 Year of Evaluation

Articles must focus on evaluations of the health sector in Africa, have at least one author who is an African national or based in Africa, and be written in English or French. According to AEJ:

Priority will be given to health evaluations contributing to or involving: policy development or policy change, health system strengthening, and/or integration of the health sector with other sectors.

{Photo: Mark Tuschman, Kenya}Photo: Mark Tuschman, Kenya

Not Beyond Us. This is the theme of World Cancer Day 2015. But how will we achieve it? Cancer can seem insurmountable. The global cancer burden is great. In 2012, 8.2 million people died from cancer-related causes—most of them in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America, which experiences more cases and more deaths than anywhere else: 60 percent of the 14 million new cancer cases annually and 70 percent of all cancer-related deaths occur in the developing world. The same countries bearing the brunt of the cancer burden have the fewest resources to tackle it.

Still we know and remind one another today, the 4th of February: We can and must stop vaccine-preventable cancers and reduce preventable cancer deaths. We must reduce the cancer inequities.

Cancer, you are not beyond us.  

Among women, cervical cancer is one of the deadliest -- and most easily preventable -- cancers.  Women in the developing world account for 85 percent of the 270,000 deaths every year.  Yet we know that effective prevention, treatment and care are possible.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

This post originally appeared on Devex.

Cancer is gaining ground in the developing world.

People in poor countries are more likely to die from cancer, and die far younger, than people in rich countries. Today, on World Cancer Day, this cancer divide continues to worsen. Even as misconceptions have receded, the reality hasn’t.

There’s been political progress at the global level, including the 2011 U.N. resolution on noncommunicable diseases like cancer. Yet the traditional mode of global assistance for developing countries — aid funding — hasn’t been forthcoming. Without it, the NCD agenda has gained little traction in those countries.

Perhaps the answer isn’t countries at all.

Pages

Printer Friendly VersionPDF