Uniting to End TB

{Photo Credit: Rui Pires}Photo Credit: Rui Pires

Tuberculosis (TB) kills more people each year than any other infectious disease. It severely strains health systems and local, regional, and national economies. And, like many health crises, the disease disproportionately affects vulnerable populations. Many families incur catastrophic costs, aggravating poverty in communities.

This World TB Day, we reflect on the progress we've made and the challenges we still face in the fight to end TB. The key moving forward is to work together to ensure we don't leave anyone behind.

VIDEO: Working to End TB in Uganda

“We have the medicines that actually cure tuberculosis,” said Raymond Byaruhanga, project director for the USAID-funded, MSH-led TRACK TB project in Uganda. “So the question is why? Why [do we still see] TB today, and why isn’t it being treated?”

In 2015, TB caused 1.8 million deaths around the world, and another 10 million people fell ill from the disease, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Women and children are particularly vulnerable. TB causes between 6 and 15 percent of all maternal deaths, and childhood TB is too often not detected, diagnosed, or treated.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

MSH will host and support events in five countries this week to honor World TB Day.

Observed March 24, World TB Day raises awareness and mobilizes support for efforts around the world working to end tuberculosis (TB). The World Health Organization (WHO) has designated this year’s theme as “Unite to End TB: Leave No One Behind,” and many of the day’s activities will focus on addressing stigma, discrimination, and marginalization.

MSH has been a leader in strengthening health systems to fight against TB since 1999 and is working with partners in 22 countries to prevent the spread of the disease and improve the lives of those affected by it.

In Afghanistan, the Challenge TB project — funded by USAID  — will lead 20 awareness events in five cities and will deliver messaging about TB in schools and health facilities. The project will also lead conferences in three provinces, focusing on successful interventions like Urban Directly Observed Treatment and the TB Information System.

The Challenge TB project will also lead World TB Day activities in 11 districts in Bangladesh, ranging from orientations and discussions with workers, to programs at schools, to rallies, to a “sputum collection camp” at an outreach center.

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