digital technology

The objective of this study was to describe the conceptual and implementation approach of selected digital health technologies that were tailored in various resource-constrained countries. Drawing from our multi-year institutional experience in more than 20 high disease-burden countries that aspire to meet the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, we screened internal project documentation on various digital health tools that provide clarity in the conceptual and implementation approach. Taking into account geographic diversity, we provide a descriptive review of five selected case studies from Bangladesh (Asia), Mali (Francophone Africa), Uganda (East Africa), Mozambique (Lusophone Africa), and Namibia (Southern Africa). A key lesson learned is to harness and build on existing governance structures. The use of data for decision-making at all levels needs to be cultivated and sustained through multi-stakeholder partnerships. The next phase of information management development is to build systems for triangulation of data from patients, commodities, geomapping, and other parameters of the pharmaceutical system. A well-defined research agenda must be developed to determine the effectiveness of the country- and regional-level dashboards as an early warning system to mitigate stock-outs and wastage of medicines and commodities.

Ukraine has successfully implemented e-TB Manager nationwide as its mandatory national tuberculosis registry after first introducing it in 2009. Our objective was to perform an end-of-programme evaluation after formal handover of the registry administration to Ukraine's Centre for Disease Control in 2015. Of the 5.9 million transactions over a 4-year period, nine out of 24 oblasts (regions) and Kiev City accounted for 62.5% of all transactions, and corresponded to 59% of Ukraine's tuberculosis burden. There were 437 unique active users in 486 rayons (districts) of Ukraine, demonstrating extensive reach.

Users of e-TB Manager, a web-based eHealth system institutionalized in 10 resource-constrained countries that account for one-third of the world’s tuberculosis (TB) burden, reported that e-TB Manager helped to improve patient care and workplace productivity, and they found it reliable for case management. The users--especially those with more experience in TB programs and those who had used the system for more than two years--were generally satisfied with the system. Responses came from Armenia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia, Namibia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Ukraine, and Vietnam. The study concluded that younger users and those with less experience in TB programs need more training, and institutional capacity for managing e-TB Manager takes at least five years. The capacity  to manage e-TB Manager has been built in Brazil and Ukraine.

Priority digital health products will be profiled and developed to support the scale-up of WHO's End TB Strategy.

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