chronic NCDs

 {Management Sciences for Health and Novo Nordisk}Save Lives of Women & Newborns through Gestational Diabetes Screening: A Call to Action (Postcard: front)Management Sciences for Health and Novo Nordisk

Detecting and treating diabetes in pregnancy offers a simple, low-cost opportunity to improve maternal and child health and reduce maternal deaths. Yet, it has received scant attention as a public health priority, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

To put gestational diabetes on the global development agenda and call for action, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Novo Nordisk sponsored a technical advocacy event on the sidelines of the 68th World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva that closely examined gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and featured case studies and lessons learned from Ethiopia and Colombia.

[Catharine Howard Taylor, MSH Vice President, Center for Health Services, gives an overview of gestational diabetes and the need for routine screening to open the conversation.] {Photo credit: Barbara Ayotte/MSH}Catharine Howard Taylor, MSH Vice President, Center for Health Services, gives an overview of gestational diabetes and the need for routine screening to open the conversation.Photo credit: Barbara Ayotte/MSH

 {Photo by: World Health Organization}Part of the poster for World No Tobacco Day. Raising taxes on tobacco is the most effective way to reduce its consumption.Photo by: World Health Organization

This post originally appeared on Devex.com.

When people get sick in Senegal, like in many other low- and middle-income countries, they often find that quality health care services are unaffordable. The majority of health spending is out-of-pocket, meaning people aren’t enrolled in health insurance plans, or their plans’ benefits are limited.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

In the beginning of my medical career during the early 1990’s, I witnessed the devastating effects of HIV & AIDS.  Nearly 60 percent of the hospital beds I attended were filled with AIDS patients, many of them my close friends and colleagues. At the time, little was known about the AIDS epidemic; no effective treatments were available; and as a physician, I watched helplessly as day after day those closest to me suffered until their death.  

Today, almost three decades later, thanks to increased prevention and access to care and treatment for HIV, most of these hospital beds have emptied of HIV & AIDS patients.  Now, these same beds are filled by those suffering from preventable chronic diseases, including vaccine-preventable cancers.

Today, February 4, we commemorate World Cancer Day, joining the global community to raise awareness about the global cancer epidemic, and renew our commitment to address cancer in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs).

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