vector control

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

April 2014 is an important month for malaria control. On April 25, the global community commemorates World Malaria Day 2014, with a theme of: "Invest in the Future: Defeat Malaria". Earlier this month, April 7, the theme of World Health Day highlighted the "small bite, big threat" of vector-borne diseases.

To commemorate these days and advance effective malaria programming worldwide, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) will host a 3-day virtual seminar, April 22-24 focusing on State of the Art Malaria Programming that leads to malaria elimination in this generation. The sub-themes of the seminar are:

  • April 22: State of Art for Malaria Elimination
  • April 23: Malaria Pharmaceutical Management
  • April 24: Vector Control, Prevention, and Parasitology

Participants must register on LeaderNet to participate.

 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera.}A Rwandan mother and newborn rest under a bed net.Photo credit: Todd Shapera.

Over one hundred years ago on this date, (August 20, 1897), British scientist Sir Ronald Ross discovered that infected female mosquitoes transmit malaria between humans. (Like any vector borne disease, the malaria-causing parasite, Plasmodium, needs a specific host: in this case, the mosquito. The female mosquito needs blood to nourish her eggs; the male just eats nectar.) Dr. Ross received the Nobel Prize for his discovery that year. Today, we mark the day, August 20, as “World Mosquito Day.”

What’s all the buzz about?

A child in sub-Saharan Africa dies every minute as a result of malaria—more than 1,400 children globally every day. Malaria affects about 220 million people, with 80 percent of all cases occurring in just 17 countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 660,000 people died from the disease in 2010; most in Africa. Two countries—Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Nigeria—hold 40 percent of the burden of malaria mortality. Despite these challenges, progress is being made: since 2000, malaria mortality rates have dropped 33 percent in Africa, and 25 percent globally (more on malaria from WHO).

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