blended learning

{Photo credit: MSH staff.}Photo credit: MSH staff.

This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.

In my role as a capacity building advisor, I design a lot of learning programs. Time and again, I find myself asking:

How can I present technical content in a way that will best enable my audience to apply new knowledge and skills in their work environment?

Should I use a mobile phone app?

What about some on-the-job-learning?

Or maybe an expert lecturer with case studies?

As I design these learning programs, I come back to two key questions:

  1. What’s the right learning environment: instructor-led, team-based, peer-to-peer, or self-study?
  2. What’s the right media: face-to-face, online, radio, print, mobile, or social media?

The blend of media and learning environment is a key factor in best preparing an audience to apply new knowledge and skills. There is no one right solution or one right blend–it depends on the content, the people, and what you want those people to do differently as a result of the capacity building program.

Karen Chio of MSH developed the K4Health Blended Learning Guide in collaboration with Liz McLean of MSH and Sara Mazursky and Lisa Mwaikambo of JHU-CCP (2013).Karen Chio of MSH developed the K4Health Blended Learning Guide in collaboration with Liz McLean of MSH and Sara Mazursky and Lisa Mwaikambo of JHU-CCP (2013).

Cross-posted with permission from the K4Health blogK4Health is a USAID project, led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for Communication Programs (JHU-CCP), with partners FHI-360 and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

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