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Tanzanian woman (Photo credit: MSH)Tanzanian woman (Photo credit: MSH)

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) invites you to attend the following sessions and poster presentations at the Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania --- whether in person at the Arusha International Conference Center, or watching via archived videos online. (All times are listed in Eastern Africa Time: UTC/GMT +3 hours. Sessions will be recorded and available within 24 hours.)

Sessions: Tuesday, January 15

Improving access to essential maternal health medicines (Track 3): 13:30–15:00 · Simba

Moderator: Deborah Armbruster, USAID

At a satellite session at the 2011 International Conference on Family Planning on November 30 in Dakar, MSH asked five panelists to discuss successes in family planning, and what still needs to be done. The conversation was moderated by MSH’s Issakha Diallo and held in conjunction with a celebration of MSH’s 40th anniversary.

GNU Fellow Marzila Mashal (far right) of Afghanistan attends Leadership Development Program in Egypt

Editor’s Note: Marzila Mashal, an Administrative Coordinator working in Kabul, Afghanistan, was awarded a month long fellowship that is awarded to two MSH staffers each year. The Fellowship was established in honor of Carmen Urdaneta, Amy Lynn Niebling, and Cristi Gadue who on February 3, 2005, died in a plane crash outside Kabul, Afghanistan. The Gadue-Niebling-Urdaneta (GNU) Memorial Fund was established to further the work to which these remarkable women dedicated their lives. Each year, the GNU Fellowship provides MSH employees based in the US and the field with an international public health opportunity at another MSH location.

Guest post by Dr. Ahmad Masoud Rahmani

Dr. Ahmad Masoud Rahmani is the National Director of the Afghanistan National Blood Safety and Transfusion Services Directorate, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Dr. Masoud was a participant in the MSH Leadership Development Program offered by the USAID-funded Technical Support to the Central and Provincial Ministry of Public Health project (Tech-Serve) in Afghanistan last year. 

The National Blood Transfusion service in Afghanistan has the responsibility for ensuring that a safe and adequate blood supply is available for all people who need it. This is a free service to all citizens of Afghanistan as mandated by our parliament. Yet to us the costs of providing one pint of blood is very high, about $30 per unit. This includes the cost of consumables, testing of blood, refreshments to blood donors, and the cost of supporting staff and services. For Afghanistan, a country devastated by internal strife and war, this is a very high burden to carry by the Ministry of Public Health.

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