Supply Chain Management System

Yvonise is a good-natured 40-year-old woman with an easy smile. She is mother to four children: two boys and two girls. Her youngest, a little girl, is six years old.

Today, Yvonise sits patiently at the pharmacy of Hôpital Immaculée Conception de Port-de-Paix (HIC Port-de-Paix) in Haiti, waiting for Miss Sevrine, her caregiver, to provide her with a month’s supply of life-saving medicine.

Yvonise is one of 2,200 patients enrolled in the HIV/AIDS program at HIC Port-de-Paix. She was infected years ago with the AIDS virus, but her family does not know. Keeping her secret is a constant burden.

“I tell my kids that I have an infection for which I am being treated,” she said. This is how she justifies her monthly trips to the hospital.

Yvonise knows first hand how important it is for her to keep her appointments. “Since I’ve been coming to the clinic and taking my medication, I’ve been feeling more energetic,” she said, grinning from ear to ear.

This year is not only MSH’s 40th anniversary; it is also 30 years since the first reported cases of HIV. Thirty years ago HIV was considered a new, always-fatal disease. ...Today 6.6 million people—nearly half of those in need—will take life-saving antiretrovirals.

This blog post originally appeared on the US Agency for International Development's IMPACT blog.

Yodit Assefa (center) and procurement colleagues from PEPFAR’s Supply Chain Management System (SCMS). Photo credit: SCMS

As a procurement specialist with PEPFAR’s SCMS (the Supply Chain Management System) project, I am one of a growing number of women working in supply chain management in Ethiopia. I manage procurements of HIV/AIDS commodities---including the complex procurement of specialized medical equipment used to treat HIV/AIDS---as well as the vehicles that distribute those commodities.

Well planned, strategic procurement is a smart investment. Our team helps save money by minimizing costly unplanned and emergency procurements and buying low-value and bulky products locally.

Over 33 million people are currently living with HIV & AIDS throughout the world. Despite great strides in slowing the epidemic, there remains a stunning gap in prevention, care, and treatment efforts. This is especially true for most-at-risk-populations, which include commercial sex workers (CSWs) and their clients, injecting drug users (IDUs), men who have sex with men (MSM), and prisoners. People in these risk groups are so stigmatized and discriminated against in many countries that it becomes extremely difficult – sometimes impossible – to provide them with much-needed HIV prevention, care and treatment services. Even more, MARP behaviors often are illegal, which then compromises needed action and support from government authorities.

Denial of such basic human rights as access to prevention, care, and treatment for the most-at-risk-populations is unacceptable. It leaves those most in need underserved and severely marginalized. As World AIDS Day 2010 approaches with this year’s message of “Universal access and human rights,” I am reflecting on the specialized HIV interventions that MSH helps provide to most-at-risk populations.

The SCMS team in Port-au-Prince unload medicines from the SCMS delivery last week.

In late October 2010, the USAID Supply Chain Management System project (SCMS) distributed close to 50,000 lbs of essential products including oral rehydration salts, antibiotics, lab supplies, water treatment and ringer lactate to support Haiti's response to the cholera epidemic. The commodities came from existing stock in the SCMS warehouse as well as products available on the local market. SCMS also provided international procurements of 60,000 IV solution units and 20,000 IV sets.

Antoine Fadoul is the Supply Chain Management System Country Director in Haiti.

On Saturday, October 23, a four-member group from the Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité (SDSH) project, led by MSH’s Dr. Patrick Dimanche, conducted an initial on-the-ground assessment and provided support for five local NGO partners---Service and Development Agency (SADA) in Mattheux/West Department, Saint-Paul Health Center in Montrouis/West Department, Pierre Payen Health Center in Pierre Payen/Lower Artibonite Department, Hospital Albert Schweitzer/Lower Artibonite Department, and Claire Heureuse Community Hospital/Upper Artibonite Department---that have cared for over a third of the 2,364 cases reported thus far. Ninety-eight of the reported 208 deaths have occurred in four of these five health facilities.

The three USAID-funded projects managed by MSH in Haiti---SDSH, Leadership, Management, and Sustainability (LMS), and the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) project---are working together to deliver emergency commodities including bed sheets, towels, adult diapers, disposable gloves, oral rehydration salts, IV solution, water treatment tablets, and soap.

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