supply chain management

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

MSH's May 2015 newsletter highlights the global health impact of pharmaceutical management: Ensuring access to affordable, quality medicines saves lives (subscribe).

Introduction

by Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH

Health care is largely dependent upon essential medicines for preventing infection, reducing pain, and treating illness. The development of effective medicines, however, is only the beginning.

Quality care means getting the right medicine, in the right dose, at an affordable price, for all the people who need it.

Accessible, affordable, and properly used medicines save lives. Major childhood killers like diarrhea, pneumonia, malaria, and even HIV, are preventable or treatable with essential medicines. But for many children, where they live means the difference between life and death: some 30,000 children in developing countries die every year from diseases treatable with basic essential medicines.

Chryste D. Best recently was named one of the top 300 women in global Health. Best establishes the processes, procedures, and controls to ensure that all products procured and supplied by the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) meet appropriate quality standards.

We spoke with MSH’s Chryste D. Best, BS, product quality assurance manager, The Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM), about her selection as one of the top 300 women leaders in global health by the Global Health Programme of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. Best provides innovative quality assurance oversight for the global procurement of medicines and commodities by MSH and partners.

{Photo: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu}Photo: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu

The Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM), an organization formed through a partnership between Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and John Snow Research & Training Institute, Inc., (JSI R&T), uses an innovative consortium model that draws on the capabilities and experience of 13 internationally-renowned organizations. PFSCM harnesses this expertise to strengthen, develop and manage secure, reliable, cost-effective and sustainable supply chains to meet the needs of health care and other public services. Since 2009, PFSCM has leveraged this unique expertise to manage the Pooled Procurement Mechanism (PPM), previously known as Voluntary Pooled Procurement (VPP).

Funded by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (The Global Fund), PPM procures and delivers about $46.6 million in life-saving health care products monthly, including HIV and malaria medicines, test kits, and related commodities. As a managing partner in PPM, MSH has played a key role in the mechanism’s overall management and strategy.

{Photo credit: C. Gilmartin/MSH}Photo credit: C. Gilmartin/MSH

For five years, the USAID-funded, MSH-led Leadership, Management and Sustainability project in Haiti (LMS/Haiti) worked with the Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) and local NGOs to ensure a steady supply of family planning commodities to nearly 300 facilities throughout the country amid bone-rattling roads, surging rivers, and rocky footpaths.

Said Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP, at the project’s closing ceremony April 14:

It is with real pride and great emotion that I salute LMS/Haiti.

LMS/Haiti’s greatest success, as everyone present can attest, was to guarantee the availability of family planning commodities at all times to ministry sites, with zero stock-out.

[ Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP.] {Photo: MSH staff} Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP.Photo: MSH staff

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

Nearly three years ago, I blogged about a systems approach to improving access for a Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) series on maternal health commodities:

Increasing access to essential medicines and supplies for maternal health requires a systems approach that includes: improving governance of pharmaceutical systems, strengthening supply chain management, increasing the availability of information for decision-making, developing appropriate financing strategies and promoting rational use of medicines and supplies.

Unpublished
{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

The availability of new and essential medicines and other health technologies to treat life-threatening illnesses have helped millions of people lead long and productive lives. However, global availability does not necessarily mean access by the end-consumer to these lifesaving health products in low-and middle-income countries. Effective supply chains are needed to deliver these health products in hard-to-reach, resource-constrained settings that often times are inhospitable to collaborative, high-performing supply chain systems.

So how do we get safe, quality, essential medicines and commodities to the people who need them, at the right time and in the right quantities?

In commemoration of World Malaria Day, SIAPS joins the global health community in recognizing the remarkable strides that have been made in the fight against malaria. More than ever, people in malaria-endemic countries, especially those who are particularly vulnerable like mothers and children, are receiving effective prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services and have better access to life-saving antimalarial medicines and health supplies. In 2012, over 200 million rapid diagnostic tests and over 330 million courses of antimalarial treatment were provided globally. The scale-up of malaria interventions between 2000 and 2012 are estimated to have saved 3.3 million lives, the overwhelming majority of which (3 million) are children.[1]

As impressive as these strides are, there’s more to be done before we can eliminate malaria globally. Each year, over 200 million people are infected with the parasite that causes malaria and well over half a million die as a result. Sustained progress against malaria will require new approaches, strategies, and solutions to combat the emerging threat of drug resistance, address presumptive prescribing and treatment practices, and ensure sustainability of existing programs.

 {Photo credit: Jimmy Felix/SCMS in Haiti.}“John” is a healthy 2-year-old, thanks to HIV medication for his mother.Photo credit: Jimmy Felix/SCMS in Haiti.

SCMS and MSH at the forefront of efforts to remove supply chain barriers to the scale up of HIV/AIDS treatment programs

For many of us in the developed world, it is easy to overlook the critical role that well-functioning supply chains play in effective healthcare. When supply chains are operating as they should, we take for granted that the medicines we need will be in stock and available. Yet throughout the developing world, most patients’ access to critical health commodities is much more tenuous; linking medicines to the health professionals that provide treatment and the people who receive care remains a central challenge facing national health systems.

Ensuring that supply chains are sustainable and can tap into high-quality, low-cost medicines, presents an even greater challenge.

The Supply Chain Management Subgroup of the Community Case Management (CCM) Taskforce is organizing a webinar series, beginning May 15, 2013.

Hosted by the CORE Group, the May 15 webinar will "provide an overview of the common pitfalls and bottlenecks of the CCM supply chain and potential solutions to these challenges."

Jane Briggs, principal technical advisor for USAID's Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) at MSH, and Sarah Andersson, a country technical advisor for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Supply Chain for Community Case Management (SC4CCM) at John Snow, Inc. (JSI), will present.

Visit the CORE Group website for the webinar link, or (if you miss it) to watch the recording.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - supply chain management