South Sudan

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

This blog post is a web-formatted version of the Global Health Impact newsletter: Stronger Health Systems Stop TB and Save Lives (December 2015). (View or share the email version here.) We welcome your feedback and questions in the comments or email us. On social media, use hashtag and tag .  Subscribe

{Photo: Dominic Chavez}Photo: Dominic Chavez

The key element of any health system is the people who run it. Nowhere is this more true than in countries in the midst of, or recovering from, conflict. Indirect or direct threats faced by health workers exacerbate a population’s challenges in seeking and receiving health care.

In conflict settings, health workers may be forced to flee to safe havens as refugees, internally displaced people, or leave the country as migrants—if they have the means to do so. Some of the most capable are absorbed into international agencies. Those who remain frequently have insufficient resources to perform their jobs and must carry on as best as they can under daunting circumstances.

This situation has worsened in recent years with a growing number of direct attacks on health workers in fragile states, such as those against polio vaccinators in Pakistan and Nigeria. These blatant violations of the Geneva Conventions inhibit an already difficult environment for the delivery of health services and the recovery or development of the health system.

 {Photo credit: Dominic Chavez}South Sudan.Photo credit: Dominic Chavez

In December 2013, Africa’s newest country, South Sudan, imploded with violence between government forces and a rebel opposition led by a former vice president. The violence continues today despite regional efforts at reconciliation by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) and other state actors. The war, however, has not stopped South Sudan’s frontline health workers in their efforts to build a public health system, including access to medicines, from the ground up.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program is working with our South Sudanese partners to build the institutional, technical, and organizational capacity of the country’s health system—despite the ongoing conflict.

Our approach to strengthening the health system is based around the concept of embedment—where full-time technical advisors work with their South Sudanese counterparts on a day-to-day basis. This approach strengthens the technical and managerial capacity of local leaders, ensuring sustainability, while, at the same time, getting the job done: building a strong health system.

"I thought I [would] go home with a dead child. I came carrying my child on my back. She was lifeless. Now my child is well and she is walking," said the mother of 5-year-old Ajak in South Sudan.

Ajak was ill with malaria, the number one cause of death in South Sudan.  Ajak and her mother had come from Nyeith village to Panthou Primary Health Care Center (PHCC) in Aweil South County, a facility supported by the MSH-led, USAID-funded Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II). SHTP II focused on improving the diagnosis and treatment of malaria in that fragile state emerging from 35 years of conflict. Arriving in a coma, Ajak was admitted to the pediatric ward for further management and investigation.

The Panthou medical team immediately started Ajak on a quinine drip for a presumed malaria infection, which blood slides then confirmed. The following day Ajak remained in a coma, and her mother’s hopes for her child’s recovery were fading. In discussion with family members, Ajak's mother decided it was time to bring the sick child back home to their village.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

This special January 2014 edition of the Global Health Impact Newsletter (subscribe) features 12 stories from 2013 highlighting how MSH is saving lives by strengthening health systems at all levels--from the household to the community to the health facility to national authorities. The stories were selected through an internal storytelling contest (available in print soon).

We are also pleased to share a post from President and CEO Jonathan D. Quick outlining our vision for 2014.

A Note from Dr. Jonathan D. Quick

Vision 2014: UHC and the Opportunity for a Healthy Life

Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).

On the eve of World Tuberculosis Day, Voice of America interviewed Dr. Stephen Macharia, the TB CARE I country director for South Sudan.

During the interview (transcript, PDF), Dr. Macharia discussed the TB epidemic in South Sudan, TB CARE I project achievements, and the way forward for improving funding for TB services and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) control in fragile states, like South Sudan.

TB CARE I is a USAID-funded project, led by KNCV TB Foundation with partners, including Management Sciences for Health.

Voice of America, the official external broadcast institution of the United States federal government, produces nearly 1,500 hours of news and programs each week for an estimated global audience of 123 million people.

 {Photo credit: Stephen Macharia/MSH.}Santo (right) and his father (left) share how Santo was finally diagnosed and treated for TB after being incorrectly treated for malaria for over two months.Photo credit: Stephen Macharia/MSH.

After South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in 2011, disagreements over oil-sharing between the two nations caused fighting and high economic inflation in certain regions. Desperate for security, over 110,000 Sudanese refugees escaped to South Sudan and now reside in camps in Maban County.

Bounj Hospital: Diagnosing and treating residents and refugees

These refugees, and the county’s 40,000 residents, are served by Bounj Hospital, the only TB diagnostic and treatment center in the district. This hospital is currently treating 75 patients for TB, 56 of whom are refugees.

The USAID-funded TB CARE I South Sudan project is helping to build the hospital staff’s capacity in TB treatment and infection control, despite the challenges the health workers face. Led by Management Sciences of Health in partnership with the National TB Program (NTP), the TB CARE I project team has trained over 200 health workers in TB diagnosis and treatment.

TB CARE I also teaches the health workers how to educate their patients about TB infection control and provides the trainees with regular supportive supervision and mentorship.

World TB Day celebration in Ghana (2012). {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Sunday, March 24, 2013, is World TB Day, and MSH staff and partners are promoting global efforts to stop TB throughout the week.

Here are highlights from some of our activities around the world:

The Afghanistan TB CARE I team is working with the national TB program (NTP) to conduct celebration events at 290 health facilities and communities in 13 USAID-supported provinces. TB messages will be aired through local telephone companies to approximately one million people throughout the nation. TB CARE I is also identifying and publicly rewarding high-performing health workers.

The Bangladesh SIAPS TB team will participate in a national rally on March 24 with all TB partners and stakeholders within the NTP network, as well as in a press conference, workshop, and scientific session.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - South Sudan