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 {Maternal Health Task Force}Critical Maternal Health Knowledge GapsMaternal Health Task Force

Cross-posted with permission from the Maternal Health Taskforce (MHTF) blog.

As we reflect on lessons learned from the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) and set strategies for improving global maternal health, it’s time to identify what has worked and what more is needed to not only avert preventable maternal deaths, but also provide quality health care for every woman.

In a paper published last month, Tamil Kendall, a post-doctoral fellow of the Maternal Health Task Force, summarizes priorities for maternal health research in low- and middle-income countries based on three broad questions she asked 26 maternal health researchers from five continents:

1. Critical maternal health knowledge gaps

“We know what to do. But the interactions between the interventions and the health system have not been studied”

 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Gisenyi District Hospital, Rwanda.Photo credit: Todd Shapera

The African Evaluation Journal (AEJ), the official journal for the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA), is calling for articles and peer reviewers for the special AEJ edition “Health Evaluations in Africa.” This process presents an exciting opportunity to participate in Africa’s contribution to the internationally-declared 2015 Year of Evaluation

Articles must focus on evaluations of the health sector in Africa, have at least one author who is an African national or based in Africa, and be written in English or French. According to AEJ:

Priority will be given to health evaluations contributing to or involving: policy development or policy change, health system strengthening, and/or integration of the health sector with other sectors.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}A community health worker uses a mobile phone for health information while caring for a sick child in Salima, Malawi.Photo credit: MSH staff

Natalie Campbell and Elizabeth McLean of MSH and colleagues co-authored a new journal article, "Taking knowledge for health the extra mile: participatory evaluation of a mobile phone intervention for community health workers in Malawi," in the latest issue of Global Health: Science and Practice.

This post originally appeared on the K4Health blog.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

Every year, billions of US dollars’ worth of medicines are purchased by or through international procurement agencies, NGOS–such as UNICEF, UNITAID, The Global Fund, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)–and governments for use in developing countries. The World Health Organization’s (WHO's) PreQualification of Medicines Programme (PQP) helps ensure that these medicines meet acceptable standards of quality, safety and efficacy.

The US government’s procurement of quality, generic drugs through the US President’s Plan for Emergency AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has saved millions of lives and led to enormous cost savings.

According to a new research paper, published January 16 in Journal of Public Health Policy:

Health for All.Health for All.

The October edition of MSH's Global Health Impact newsletter (subscribe), features stories of people, communities, and countries on the road toward universal health coverage (UHC).

The vital role of the essential package for health impact

On the Road to Universal Health Coverage: The Vital Role of the Essential Package for Health Impact

Cross-posted from the Global Health Magazine blog.

How did Malawi control its brain drain?

The British Medical Journal issued a report last month estimating that nine African countries have lost $2 billion worth of investment in training and educating doctors who have subsequently migrated abroad. It needn't be this way. Doctors, nurses and other health professionals do not have to give up home, family and country to earn enough money to give themselves and their children a future, even a modest one. And it needn't cost low income countries billions of dollars to train the doctors and nurses who then leave for greener pastures.

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