nurses

The Improving Performance of Nurses (IPN) project in Upper Egypt celebrated the first Arabic publication of Management Sciences for Health's (MSH)'s “Managers Who Lead” handbook with an event last November. A delegation of prominent leaders from Egypt’s health sector---including representatives from the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), Egyptian universities and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), MSH, and USAID---attended the event in Cairo.

At the event, there was a feeling of hope for the future of the health sector in Egypt, and that this handbook is a small but important part of that future. Dr. Emad Ezat, director of health and nurses sector at MOHP, praised the book for helping to strengthen the performance of health organizations and improving health services. Dr. Abdo Al Swasy, IPN program manager, spoke of the work that had gone into the handbook and its importance. Dr. Gihan Fathy, IPN field manager, highlighted some of the tangible effects from the use of this book in the field, including building nurse leaders able to make decisions independently for positive changes in the health community.

Esther manages commodity supplies with meticulous record keeping {Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.

This is the advice that Esther Wahome, a registered community health nurse in a Kenyan health facility, gives to her clients when they come to the tuberculosis (TB) clinic. Within a short time, Esther dispenses the drugs to the patient, provides health care advice and updates her records.

Esther’s TB clinic clients are usually referred to Kayole II sub-district hospital from Toto Bora and other smaller health care centers. Kayole II, located on the outskirts of Nairobi, provides free health services and receives nearly 300 outpatients each day.

During a routine supervisory visit conducted by the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) Program, Esther, a mother of two, spoke about her work at the Kayole II TB Clinic, which she has been running for the last three months.

“I like serving in the TB clinic because I get to see patients who are weak regain their strength. Sometimes the patients come in when they are so weak and close to skin and bones that at times I wonder where to inject them. Seeing patients thrive fulfills me and is my joy,” says a smiling Esther.

Anna outside Kaginima Hospital, eastern Uganda. {Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.}Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.

“I knew I wanted to be a nurse since I was 10. A woman used to come home to my village in her nurse uniform on the weekends and she was so smart and nice. It was my goal,” said Anna.

Anna finished nursing school and her formal training in 1998 and started working in 1999. In 2000, she began working at Kaginima Hospital in eastern Uganda, where she still works today.

Kaginima Hospital is an expanding facility and uniquely has a lot of space for patients and services. The facility has a surgical theater with two beds and is well stocked with medical supplies. As a private, nonprofit hospital, Kaginima does not receive any support from the Ugandan government. The hospital relies on support from USAID, international organizations, faith-based organizations, and local nongovernmental organizations. They also charge nominal fees for the services directly to patients.

Sophia is now the go-to person for family planning and reproductive health services at Rwesande health center IV in western Uganda. {Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.}Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.

Sophia is a humble woman. She has been working as a nurse for 10 years, and is currently one of five nurses posted at Rwesande health center IV in the hills of western Uganda.

When I arrived I was impressed by the number of services the health center offers, and the general appreciation felt around the compound. Rwesande health center IV has a maternity ward to safely deliver babies; counseling areas for family planning, reproductive health, and HIV; a general ward, a surgery theater, and health education space.

Family planning counseling and services now available

As Sophia shows me her meticulously-kept record books I can see the pride she takes in her work. She explained how women are now coming and asking for family planning services.

Not too long ago clients were not coming, and the nurses didn’t have proper training on methods to offer clients.

Cross-posted from the Global Health Magazine blog.

How did Malawi control its brain drain?

The British Medical Journal issued a report last month estimating that nine African countries have lost $2 billion worth of investment in training and educating doctors who have subsequently migrated abroad. It needn't be this way. Doctors, nurses and other health professionals do not have to give up home, family and country to earn enough money to give themselves and their children a future, even a modest one. And it needn't cost low income countries billions of dollars to train the doctors and nurses who then leave for greener pastures.

Samiha Badawy, a nurse at the Al Sabaeyya Hospital in Aswan, Eqypt, other nurses, health managers and Directorate of Health staff, are learning how to improve infection control and patient safety through a leadership development program called Improving the Performance of Nurses (IPN).

Simi Grewal is the Program Coordinator for Health Systems Strengthening and Results Management at MSH. She worked as a fellow in Egypt from January 16-February 5.

Women Nurses at Results Presentation in Aswan, Egypt

In Aswan, Egypt’s sunniest southern city located about one and a half hours by plane from Cairo, the Nile is at its most striking. Tropical plants grow along the edges of the flowing river, and the amber desert and granite rocks surround orchards of palm trees.

I was honored to be present in Aswan during one of Management Sciences for Health’s most important events; the results presentation of the Leadership Development Program (LDP), funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) as part of the Improving the Performance of Nurses in Upper Egypt (IPN) project in the Aswan governorate.

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