Maheen Malik

 {Photo credit: Brigid Boettler/MSH}A participant asks a question during the congressional briefing on saving women's & children's lives in fragile countries.Photo credit: Brigid Boettler/MSH

It can be easy to take healthcare workers for granted. For the majority of us living in the United States, you know that a trained doctor and nurse will see you when you need assistance; a lab technician will do your blood work; and a certified pharmacist will dispense your prescriptions. But imagine going into labor and not knowing if a midwife or doctor will be present? Or, if you need a medication and there is no pharmacy to provide it?

These are the challenges facing millions of people in low- and middle-income countries—and the problems are made worse for those living in rural areas and/or fragile states.

Training health workers

To address this ongoing challenge, MSH, with International Medical Corps and the Frontline Health Workers Coalition, organized a Congressional briefing with the Congressional Women’s Caucus on March 26: “Saving Women’s and Children’s Lives: Strengthening the Health Workforce in Fragile Countries.”

At the heart of the discussion was the acknowledgement that to save lives you must have a strong health system and a strong health workforce.

Jane Briggs of the USAID-funded SIAPS program at MSH gives examples from Rwanda and Kenya during the Improving Access to Essential Maternal Health Medicines session on the first day of the conference. {Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.}Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.

Cross-posted from the SIAPS website.

“Respectful maternal care was said to be more than just a means to an end, and can be framed as several issues: human rights, quality of care, equity and public health,” Jocalyn Clark, senior editor of PLoS Medicine, noted about the final day of the 2013 Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC).

The conference brought together scientists, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to share knowledge, ideas, innovations, research, programs and policies on maternal health quality and access, among several other topics. Participants also worked on building progress towards reducing and eliminating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity.

Quality of maternal care was a consistent theme throughout the conference.

Attendees of the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) staff presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013. (Photo credits: C. Lander & J. Briggs / MSH)

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