leadership

{Photo credit: Rui Pires/Uganda}Photo credit: Rui Pires/Uganda

[HIP Brief: Leaders and Managers: Making Family Planning Programs Work]HIP Brief: Leaders and Managers: Making Family Planning Programs WorkFor years, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and partners have championed and advocated that leadership and management be recognized as a high-impact practice (HIP) for family planning. Proven, promising, and emerging practices in family planning are codified in HIP briefs, publications developed by collaborating partners, with support from the US government, and rigorously reviewed by experts in family planning practice.

{Photo: Glenn Ruga}Photo: Glenn Ruga

Are you interested in youth leadership for family planning and reproductive health?

Join the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project () for the launch of the Twitter Q&A Series on Thursday, August 6, 2015, at 10 am ET.

MSH staffer Sarah Lindsay () will be answering questions about the importance of youth leadership development; the roles youth leaders play; and the LMG Project's support for young leaders improving family planning and reproductive health in their communities.

Not on Twitter? No problem! On Thursday, we'll also answer questions on the LMG Project's Facebook page, and create a digital recap after the Q&A wraps up.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

[UN's final MDG Report 2015]UN's final MDG Report 20152015 — the finish line of the United Nations' grand experiment, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Framed in 2000, the MDGs represent a leap of faith by the global community to transform, through unified action, the lives of millions living under the threat of extreme poverty, malnourishment, inadequate health care, poor hygiene, and without dignity. 

As “The Millennium Development Goals Report 2015” — released in early July — shows, significant progress has been made over the last 15 years, but the work is not complete. Among the MDGs’ eight goal framework, steady progress in the areas of child mortality, maternal health, and infectious diseases (goals 4, 5, and 6) have saved and impacted millions of lives around the world.

{Photo credit: Jawad Jalali-Afghan Eyes}Photo credit: Jawad Jalali-Afghan Eyes

Update, July 30, 2015:

Prior to 2002, the vast majority of health service delivery systems in Afghanistan were non-existent or informal. The Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG)-Afghanistan project improved family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health using strategies to strengthen health leadership developed by Afghans, for Afghans.

See the Journey to Restoration on Exposure

The original post follows:

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

The benefits of good health governance are far-reaching: Leaders who govern facilitate the work of health managers. Health managers facilitate the work of health service providers.
- Management Sciences for Health

On May 11-13, 2015, the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), conducted an online seminar on LeaderNet titled Unleash the Power of Good Governance. Over the three-day seminar, 93 participants representing 75 organizations in 36 countries discussed challenges to good governance among public and civil society organizations, and how to overcome them. The seminar was offered in three languages: English, French and Spanish, and encouraged learning through source materials, the facilitators, and one another.

Three themes emerged from among the online discussion threads:

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman.}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman.

Are you strengthening youth leaders in a low or middle-income country? Take the Youth Leadership Program Survey now

Young people are the next generation of leaders.

How many times do we say this, or some version of it? Yet, do we examine the rhetoric behind it? What does it mean to strengthen youth leaders and what do programs that embody this mantra look like?

This month, with support from USAID’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health, the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project proudly launches www.YouthLeadGlobal.org, a community for youth leaders that also aims to gather information on programs that are developing youth leaders around the world with an online survey. With our collaborating networks, the International Youth Alliance for Family Planning (IYAFP) and Youth Health and Rights Coalition (YHRC), we are initiating a global search for promising youth leadership programs and approaches.

This video was originally published on YouTube (2010). Shared in the spirit of "Throwback Thursday" (TBT), this post is part of a blog series called Improving Health in Haiti: Remember, Rebuild

In 2009, a high rate of HIV & AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections, combined with a lack of leadership to address the crisis in Haiti's Cite Soleil area, resulted in a large population of disaffected youth who believed that the situation was hopeless. As part of Management Sciences for Health's (MSH) "Leadership Development Program," funded by the US Agency of International Development (USAID), young participants from the Haitian NGO Maison l'Arc-en-Ciel (MAEC) learned that they can make a difference. In their rap song entitled "Apprends à faire face aux défis," (Learn to Confront Challenges) the young leaders share what they have learned (in Creole with English subtitles).

Watch video:

{Photo credit: Maeghan Orton/Medic Mobile}Photo credit: Maeghan Orton/Medic Mobile

For more than a decade, health teams in over 40 countries have improved their performance using MSH’s Leadership Development Program (LDP) and the latest version, Leadership Development Program Plus (LDP+), which improves public health impact and scale-up. During the same period, there has been a tremendous expansion of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health and mHealth interventions, particularly using mobile devices. This past year, two MSH-led projects—the Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project in Nigeria and The Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project—collaborated with LMG partner Medic Mobile to pair the LDP+ with a mobile application to systematically capture, collate, and report LDP+ results in near-real-time.

{Photo credit: Sarah Lindsay/MSH}Photo credit: Sarah Lindsay/MSH

Cross-posted with permission from the LMG Blog.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership, Management & Governance Project (LMG), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), is launching the East Africa Women's Mentoring Network. We are calling upon women leaders who have worked in family planning and reproductive health as service providers, midwives, program managers, policy makers, teachers, advocates, and other relevant positions to support the aspirations of younger women. We are seeking mentees interested in learning from seasoned professionals and mentors with experience, wisdom, and enthusiasm.

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera.}Photo credit: Todd Shapera.

This post originally appeared on LMGforHealth.org in celebration of International Youth Day (August 12).

The current generation of 1.8 billion adolescents is the largest in history. These 1.8 billion people have a tremendous impact on all parts of the health system. Here are 10 reasons why young people can lead us to a healthier future:

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