Jim Rice

{Photo credit: Katy Doyle/MSH, West Africa}Photo credit: Katy Doyle/MSH, West Africa

The following blog post is a web-formatted version of MSH's Global Health Impact newsletter (June 2015 edition), Good Governance Strengthens Health Systems. We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments. Get Global Health Impact in your inbox

Notes

by James A. Rice, PhD

What do we mean by governance? Governance is a structured process used by a group of people—often referred to as a governing body, board, or council—to make decisions about policy, plans, and rules of collective action for an organization or system. For health organizations, the focus of this collective action is strengthening health systems to expand access to quality health services and achieve sustainable gains in health outcomes.

 {Photo credit: Rui Peres}Children in Uganda, one of many LMICs where good governance at all levels of the health system is key.Photo credit: Rui Peres

This post originally appeared on the LMGforHealth.org Blog. USAID's Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) Project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), hosted the Governance for Health (G4H) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Roundtable 2013 (G4H2013) at Georgetown University in August.

The overwhelming consensus of G4H2013? Governance matters.

Health sector leaders gathered in Washington, D.C. in August for the second roundtable on enhanced governance for the health sectors of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Governance involves decisionmaking by diverse stakeholders that set the strategic direction for public and private organizations; assembling and allocating resources needed to implement the strategic plan; monitoring the progress of champions; and protecting the mission of the organization.

 {Photo credit: MSH/Paula Champagne}Participants of "Medicines as Part of UHC: Starting a Dialogue".Photo credit: MSH/Paula Champagne

What do medicines, financing, governance, and management have in common?

They are all essential pieces of the puzzle that must come together in order to make universal health coverage (UHC) a realizable goal.

From June 2-4, 2013, Management Sciences for Health (MSH), in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation and Harvard Medical School’s Department of Population Medicine, and additional support from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID), brought representatives of countries working towards UHC, private insurance schemes, and medicines and financing experts from across the globe to start a dialogue around medicines coverage under UHC.

Dr. Jonathan Quick, MSH’s President and CEO opened the event: “UHC is about filling the tragic gaps that exist in health systems around the world: gaps in access, in affordability, and health needs that go unanswered.”

{Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Policy makers and health sector leaders in low- and middle-income countries are recognizing the value of smart governance for significant and sustained gains in health status outcomes. The new USAID Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) project, led by MSH with a consortium of partners, is actively engaged in building the capacity and competencies of those expected to accomplish smart governance.

To explore smart governance, LMG convened a Roundtable on Governance for Health in low- and middle-income countries May 18, 2012, at The Brookings Institution in Washington DC.

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