HIV Prevention Trials Network

Monday at the International AIDS Society conference in Rome, an expanded session featured information on the HPTN 052 study, the Partners PrEP Study, and the Centers for Disease Control’s TDF2 study presented in a joint session titled Treatment Is Prevention: The Proof Is Here, on Monday. The results of these trials will fundamentally change the way we think about HIV prevention and treatment, although implementation of these approaches will likely prove as challenging as ever.

HPTN 052, sponsored by the HIV Prevention Trials Network, was the first randomized clinical trial to definitively indicate that an HIV-infected individual can reduce sexual transmission of HIV to an uninfected partner by beginning antiretroviral therapy sooner. The study involved 1,763 HIV-serodiscordant couples at 13 sites across Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The trial results were initially released in May 2011 on the recommendation of an independent data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) and Monday’s session was the first full presentation of the trial data.

Yesterday the results of HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052, a clinical trial funded by the National Institutes for Health, offered definitive proof of what we have long suspected---that treating HIV infected persons substantially reduces the risk of transmitting HIV to uninfected persons.

This is FANTASTIC news and offers very convincing evidence that, at least for heterosexual discordant couples (the study was not able to enroll significant numbers of gay men), if the infected person is on ART, the uninfected partner is protected. And more broadly, it offers significant evidence that treatment is indeed highly effective in preventing transmission of HIV. This can reasonably be described as a “game changer” with respect to how we think about HIV prevention, care, and treatment. We used to talk about “treatment as prevention,” but now we can say “treatment IS prevention.”

Read the UNAIDS report here.

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - HIV Prevention Trials Network