HCSM

 {Photo credit: Anteneh Tesfaye/MSH.}MSH staff Grace Gatebi and Patrick Borruet at the MSH Kenya UHC Symposium photo exhibition.Photo credit: Anteneh Tesfaye/MSH.

The goal of universal health coverage (UHC) is to improve equitable access to health services while protecting households from impoverishing out-of-pocket health spending. In principle, UHC means that lifesaving services and medicines will be accessible and affordable for those who need them. To create deeper awareness of UHC in Kenya, Management Sciences for Health Kenya (MSH Kenya) country office organized a symposium on setting the national health agenda post 2015, called, “Achieving Universal Health Coverage through Stronger Health Systems”.

During the symposium, MSH Kenya organized a photography contest. MSH staff submitted photographs on the theme of “Achieving Universal Health Coverage in Kenya – Financing, Quality, Access and Essential Medicines” (with a focus on the most vulnerable populations). An independent jury selected 19 of the photos for an exhibition at the symposium.

{Photo credit: Mike Wang, courtesy of Photoshare.}Photo credit: Mike Wang, courtesy of Photoshare.

In Kenya, cancer is ranked third as a cause of mortality and morbidity after communicable and cardiovascular diseases.

The Ministry of Health, supported by the USAID-funded, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)-led, Health Commodities and Services Management (MSH/HCSM) Program, led the development and launch of the First National Guidelines for Cancer Management in Kenya, in collaboration with World Health Organization (WHO), Africa Cancer Foundation, and other stakeholders.

The Cancer Guidelines are intended to help increase access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, referral and management of diagnosed cases.

In Kenya, cancer-related services have previously been available only in the top private hospitals and the public teaching and referral hospitals, which have restricted access to a few well-to- do individuals who can afford the related costs. The guidelines de-mystify cancer management and have outlined the core health system requirements needed to offer services in the different tiers of health care, including: community, primary care, county referral and national referral hospitals.

Esther manages commodity supplies with meticulous record keeping {Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.

This is the advice that Esther Wahome, a registered community health nurse in a Kenyan health facility, gives to her clients when they come to the tuberculosis (TB) clinic. Within a short time, Esther dispenses the drugs to the patient, provides health care advice and updates her records.

Esther’s TB clinic clients are usually referred to Kayole II sub-district hospital from Toto Bora and other smaller health care centers. Kayole II, located on the outskirts of Nairobi, provides free health services and receives nearly 300 outpatients each day.

During a routine supervisory visit conducted by the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) Program, Esther, a mother of two, spoke about her work at the Kayole II TB Clinic, which she has been running for the last three months.

“I like serving in the TB clinic because I get to see patients who are weak regain their strength. Sometimes the patients come in when they are so weak and close to skin and bones that at times I wonder where to inject them. Seeing patients thrive fulfills me and is my joy,” says a smiling Esther.

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