GHC

 {Photo credit: MSH}H.E. Dr. Suraya Dalil, Minister of Public Health, AfghanistanPhoto credit: MSH

This post, cross-posted with permission from The Leadership, Managment, and Governance (LMG) project blog on LMGforHealth.org, is part of our Global Health Impact series on the 67th World Health Assembly in Geneva, May 18-24, 2014. MSH is co-hosting three side events focusing on the role of universal health coverage (May 20), chronic diseases (May 20), and governance for health (May 21) in the post-2015 framework. This year, six MSH representatives are attending WHA as part of the 60-plus-person Global Health Council (GHC) delegation.

{Photo credit: kjetil_r via Flickr}Photo credit: kjetil_r via Flickr

In a landmark 6-2 decision, the US Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional a 2003 law requiring organizations that receive US government funding for global health work on HIV & AIDS to have a policy explicitly opposing prostitution. The plaintiffs in the USAID v. AOSI case included the Global Health Council (GHC), Pathfinder, the Alliance for Open Society International (AOSI), and InterAction.

In a letter to GHC members, Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, chairman of the GHC board of directors and MSH president and CEO, said:

Over on the Humanosphere blog, global health blogger Tom Murphy reported recently on changes at the Global Health Council (GHC), a membership-based coalition of global health practitioners, researchers and organizations.

After closing its doors last April, the GHC has reemerged with a more sustainable approach---and a new name: Global Health Coalition.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has provided support throughout the transition, and Dr. Jonathan Quick, President and CEO of MSH, is serving as interim board chair of the new GHC. Numerous other organizations are involved in the revival, including the Seattle-based Washington Global Health Alliance and the DC-based Global Impact, which is serving as the interim Secretariat.

It was an exciting and insightful week of discussions at this month’s Global Health Council meeting on how to address the drastically growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cancers, diabetes, and heart and lung disease, in advance of the UN High Level Summit on NCDs in September. Speakers made a strong case for including NCDs as a priority on the global health agenda. The intertwining of these diseases with communicable diseases such as HIV, TB and malaria are striking. Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health described the commonalities:

The theme of this year’s Global Health Council annual conference was Securing a Healthier Future in a Changing World. As populations are shifting, so are their health priorities. Increasing urbanization has led to more people living in and around cities, creating a series of problems that are new to public health professionals. Nutritional challenges, the need for improved water and sanitation infrastructure, and addressing the issue of unregulated health care providers are all problems facing governments, ministries, NGOs, donors, and populations. In addition, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, and mental illness, are adding a new strain to many already resource constrained health systems. Of course, immunization, malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, and maternal death are all still very serious challenges in many of these systems and remain key priorities.

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