community-case management

The Supply Chain Management Subgroup of the Community Case Management (CCM) Taskforce is organizing a webinar series, beginning May 15, 2013.

Hosted by the CORE Group, the May 15 webinar will "provide an overview of the common pitfalls and bottlenecks of the CCM supply chain and potential solutions to these challenges."

Jane Briggs, principal technical advisor for USAID's Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) at MSH, and Sarah Andersson, a country technical advisor for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Supply Chain for Community Case Management (SC4CCM) at John Snow, Inc. (JSI), will present.

Visit the CORE Group website for the webinar link, or (if you miss it) to watch the recording.

Trained in kangaroo mother care by Dipeta health center staff, Imukalayi snuggled tiny Mardochet to her bare chest, then wrapped herself and her son in a cloth pagne, and held him there for hours, shifting him only when he needed to nurse. Mardochet's weight stabilized just three weeks later. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Honor your mom today by supporting MSH's work to help support healthy mothers---like Imukalayi Eponga (right)---and their children around the world.

Support healthy moms and their kids.

Imukalayi was trained on "kangaroo mother care" by MSH in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Kangaroo mother care is a simple technique that emphasizes human contact to keep the baby warm.

This year, 7.5 million children will die - 99 percent in developing countries. In Africa alone, 1 in 8 children will die before their 5th birthday. Two-thirds of these deaths are preventable.

For over 40 years, MSH has seen that when mothers receive low-cost, high-impact interventions-like kangaroo mother care training-their children will likely survive until age 5 and beyond.

Orou Assoumanou describing the work within his community to Dr. Lola Gandaho, of BASICS Benin.

 

Living in the rural village of Kpagnaroung, Benin, Orou Assoumanou is a dedicated health worker who promoted vaccinations and distributed ivermectin (a medicine used to treat roundworm) within his community before receiving training by the MSH-led, USAID BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) project in community-case management. The comprehensive BASICS training improved his ability to offer care and enabled him to treat children within his community.

With the arrival of a trained community health worker able to prescribe medications, members of his community no longer have to travel long distances to seek medical care for their children. In fact, Orou says that crowds would form at his door to receive care.

 

 

 

 

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